Talk Trans Mountain

June 23, 2014 Update

Thank you for your recent and ongoing feedback about the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. We value your feedback. It has, and will continue to be used in our planning as we continue our work to optimize our proposed pipeline corridor and then ultimately our pipeline route.

In Spring 2014 we collected feedback for other communities along the pipeline route. Online feedback for these communities has concluded, however the maps and presentations continue to be available below and in our document library.

And for more information email info@transmountain.com(External link) or join our mailing list(External link) for regular....Read more

June 23, 2014 Update

Thank you for your recent and ongoing feedback about the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. We value your feedback. It has, and will continue to be used in our planning as we continue our work to optimize our proposed pipeline corridor and then ultimately our pipeline route.

In Spring 2014 we collected feedback for other communities along the pipeline route. Online feedback for these communities has concluded, however the maps and presentations continue to be available below and in our document library.

And for more information email info@transmountain.com(External link) or join our mailing list(External link) for regular updates and notification about upcoming engagement opportunities.


About our Community Engagement

An open, extensive and thorough engagement process on all aspects of the proposed Trans Mountain Expansion Project is underway along the pipeline corridor between Strathcona County, Alberta (near Edmonton) and Burnaby, British Columbia and the marine corridor. We are reaching out to all landowners along the pipeline and meeting with community leaders, elected officials, environmental groups and Aboriginal peoples to get their input and perspective.

Ways to Participate in the Online Engagement

This online space will offer various ways to participate and provide your thoughts and feedback on the project. Check back often for updates and sign up(External link) to receive email notifications when new discussions or feedback forms are launched.

  • A feedback tool will be available on this site for each phase of the community engagement.
  • We will also host open discussion forums, at select times during the community engagement phases. 

Community Engagement Timeline 

Community engagement began in May 2012 and will continue throughout the life of project operations, if approved.

Gathering Feedback

Feedback received from public information sessions, meetings and online will be used by the Trans Mountain Expansion Project team to help inform the following aspects of the project:

  • Identifying routing alternatives where it is not practical to follow the existing Trans Mountain right-of-way
  • Determining the scope and nature of the Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment (ESA)
  • Identifying potential mitigation measures to reduce environmental or socio-economic impacts
  • Identifying potential local or regional benefits associated with the project 

All comments and concerns gathered as part of the stakeholder engagement program have been incorporated into the project’s Facilities Application which will be filed with the National Energy Board (NEB) in late 2013. These comments and concerns will be considered by the NEB in making its final recommendation regarding the proposed project.

We want to hear from you and to ensure you are informed about the project topics that most interest you. If you have a question, please post it here and we will get back to you with an answer.

  • Concerned asked

    Regarding the twinning of the pipeline in the Westsyde area of Kamloops, B.C. There was talk of the proposed new pipeline being placed west of the current pipeline in this area-did this come to fruition? If so, could the existing pipe line in this neighborhood also be placed west of its current position? This would eliminate any pipe lines in this now heavily populated residential area. We moved into this area, not knowing about the pipeline, and would be relieved to have it removed from our neighborhood. Thank you for your reply.

    29 Nov 2013, 01:48 PM
    answered
    The proposed route in the Westsyde area has not yet been confirmed. Both the Westsyde neighbourhood and west alternative route options are still being considered. The route to the west includes a section of the Lac du Bois Protected Area as well as some crown land and private properties. We are currently working through the BC Parks application process to consider the placement of the new pipeline in Lac du Bois, but we won’t know the decision on that application for some time yet.

    If the Lac du Bois application is not successful, the proposed pipeline route will be through the Westsyde neighbourhood. You can see the proposed route through Westsyde here http://talk.transmountain.com/document/show/370.

    Kinder Morgan is not considering moving the existing pipeline in Westsyde, or anywhere along the pipeline corridor at this time. We will continue to operate the existing Trans Mountain pipeline system as it exists today, in its existing location.

    To ensure the continued safe and reliable operation of our pipelines, we use a multi-layered approach to pipeline safety that encompasses integrity management, damage prevention and emergency response programs. All these measures are designed to support the continued safe and reliable operation of our pipelines. For more information on pipeline integrity management, please visit www.transmountain.com/pipeline-integrity-management.
    30 Nov 2013, 10:22 AM

  • anonymous asked

    You have not discussed the after installation matenance and continued protection of the pipeline, as continous monitoring of Cathodic protection levels, perodic depth of cover surveys on river crossings, ect

    20 Nov 2013, 08:26 AM
    answered
    Through operating the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline, we have established a multi-layered approach to pipeline safety that encompasses integrity management, damage prevention and emergency response programs, to ensure continued safe and reliable operations. We have a team dedicated to preventing damage and detailed emergency response plans for all our facilities. The pipeline is monitored 24/7 at a control centre equipped with sophisticated computerized sensing and control systems and we have automatic leak detection alarm systems, automatic shut off devices and devices that monitor the internal condition of the pipe.

    Should the proposed expansion project be approved it would also be subject to the same rigorous maintenance and protection standards as the existing pipeline.

    You can learn more about how we operate and maintain our pipeline at http://www.transmountain.com/operating-our-pipeline.
    26 Nov 2013, 06:33 AM

  • anonymous asked

    What does the statement mean that Canada is a signatory to international agreements on tanker ships being inspected by other countries. Does this mean that Canada recognizes inspections from other countries and therefore exempts these ships from Canadian inspection?

    15 Nov 2013, 04:56 PM
    answered
    This means that Canada has signed and agreed to a certain set of standards.

    The international Port State Control agreements, to which Canada is a signatory, require Transport Canada to inspect foreign vessels. Vessels that do not meet safety standards are detained until their deficiencies have been corrected. Canada has its own set of requirements and inspection schedules, which are explained on the Port State Control page, here.

    More information about annual inspections and Port State Control can be found on the Tanker Safety and Spill Prevention page on Transport Canada’s website.
    22 Nov 2013, 05:46 AM

  • anonymous asked

    How can you possibly reassure me that there will not be a disastrous spill ?

    14 Nov 2013, 02:29 PM
    answered
    While there are no guarantees, Trans Mountain has worked hard to develop a mature suite of programs to maximize the safety of the pipeline. It was while performing regular maintenance that we found this leak.

    These pipeline safety practices focus on preventing pipeline failures and minimizing their impact. They are all part of what is known as a Pipeline Integrity Management program. This program identifies all of the hazards that have the potential to affect the safety of the pipeline system and ensures that control measures are implemented to prevent or mitigate the occurrence and potential impact of each hazard.

    Additionally, we have plans to ensure we are able to respond in the event of an incident like this one. Emergency response plans are constantly being updated to keep them current. The plans are location specific, identify locations of emergency response materials and equipment, and are regularly practiced through field deployment exercises. Because of this planning, we are able to be quickly contain any spilled material and immediately begin clean up and remediation.

    As part of an ongoing commitment to safety and environmental protection, Trans Mountain takes responsibility for the cleanup and remediation of spills and we work with pre-qualified and trained consultants and contractors to ensure any spill is cleaned up as quickly as possible while ensuring the safety of the public and minimizing impacts to the environment.
    16 Nov 2013, 09:46 AM

  • StreetSmart asked

    Given that much of the opposition to the overland route has been centred on spill risk why hasn't Kinder Morgan proposed a larger twining line capable of transporting both existing oil and projected oil volumes with an end game to removing the existing 60 year old line?

    02 Nov 2013, 02:38 PM
    answered
    With a strong focus on regular maintenance, the application of the latest technology, and sound operating practices, the Trans Mountain Pipeline has an infinite lifespan.

    To ensure the continued safe and reliable operation of the Trans Mountain Pipeline, we use a multi-layered approach to pipeline safety that encompasses integrity management, damage prevention and emergency response programs. We have a team dedicated to preventing damage and detailed emergency response plans for all our facilities. The pipeline is monitored 24/7 at a control centre equipped with sophisticated computerized sensing and control systems and we have automatic leak detection alarm systems, automatic shut off devices and devices that monitor the internal condition of the pipe.

    You can learn more about how we operate and maintain our pipeline at http://www.transmountain.com/operating-our-pipeline.
    09 Nov 2013, 07:14 AM

  • anonymous asked

    As a resident of Michigan, I am horrified to read your answer to the question of cleaning up dilbit. In fact, you have no way of doing it, as was shown in the Kalamazoo spill. Also, you have no way of imagining that spills will not occur, as even with present controls, human error is rampant, and (reported) spills are averaging about 300 a year. "Don't worry, we can handle it" is not at all reassuring. How specifically will you be able to improve on methods and procedures presently in place to the point where dilbit transport is safe for the water and soil?

    01 Nov 2013, 02:48 AM
    answered
    The Trans Mountain Pipeline has been transporting petroleum products for 60 years and diluted bitumen for more than 20 years.

    Trans Mountain does have experience successfully cleaning up a dilbit spill on water. Conventional clean up methods (booms, skimmers, etc.) were used to clean up Albian Heavy Synthetic (AHS) from the Burrard Inlet during the 2007 Westridge spill. Approximately 95% (210m3) of the released oil was recovered. Ongoing monitoring of marine plant and animal life in the affected area has shown very good recovery from the spill. More information about the spill and clean-up can be found here , as well as a five-year summary of effects here .

    Emergency response plans are constantly being updated to keep them current. The plans are location specific, identify locations of emergency response materials and equipment, and are regularly practiced through field deployment exercises. You can learn more about how the Trans Mountain Pipeline is operated and maintained on the Operating and Maintaining Our Pipeline page .

    You can also view a previously asked question about shipping diluted bitumen here .
    01 Nov 2013, 08:44 AM

  • envchemist asked

    Updates on the Kalamazoo spill cleanup and a MSDS for dilbit indicate that it is heavier than water and defies cleanup using conventional surface response methods (booms, skimmers) even in the more amenable Michigan environment. How will you be able to clean up a spill of dilbit especially in remote and rugged mountain terrain?

    05 Oct 2013, 07:35 AM
    answered
    Any product moved in the pipeline must meet Kinder Morgan Canada’s tariff requirements which include the following limitations on product qualities:
    • a maximum temperature of 38 C
    • a maximum density of 940 kg/m3 (specific gravity of 0.94)
    • a maximum viscosity of 350 cSt (centistokes) at Reference Temperature
    • maximum impurities (bottom sediments and water) of 0.5% of volume
    • maximum Reid Vapour Pressure of 103 kPa (kilopascals)
    The diluted bitumen shipped in our pipeline has a maximum specific gravity of 0.94, which is lighter than water (1.00) and seawater (1.03).

    Additional research is taking place to quantify how the diluted bitumen reacts over time in water, with wave action, with fast-moving currents, with different sediment levels and with various other factors. You can learn more about Petroleum Liquids here .

    The most critical and responsible emergency preparedness strategy is to prevent a spill from occurring at all . However, in the case of a spill, Trans Mountain is prepared to respond quickly with detailed emergency procedures and trained professionals.

    Emergency response plans are constantly being updated to keep them current. The plans are location specific, identify locations of emergency response materials and equipment, and are regularly practiced through field deployment exercises. Emergency Response Training is conducted 20 – 25 times per year. The training includes table top exercises, equipment deployment and classroom learning. The deployment exercises are conducted in varying scenarios, including remote locations, in all weather conditions, including snow and ice.
    09 Oct 2013, 08:17 AM

  • ajamieson asked

    I would like to know if Kinder Morgan is currently piping any diluted bitumen or any product similar to it and putting it onto tankers to ship out of the Port of Vancouver. If so, I would like to know when this product was first shipped, and what plans are in place to clean up a spill of this toxic product in the port waters. Also, please specify the exact chemical makeup of these products (including the diluent).

    30 Sep 2013, 05:59 AM
    answered
    Tankers have loaded diluted bitumen since the late 1980’s from Trans Mountain’s Westridge Marine Terminal. Transporting diluted bitumen is as safe as transporting other types of crude oil, as indicated in several reports found on the Diluted Bitumen Information page .

    Since its inception in the 1950’s, tanker operations from Westridge have been conducted without any oil spills from tankers. We are dedicated to continuing to operate safely and without incident but if an oil spill should occur in the marine environment, multiple organizations quickly take co-ordinated action to mitigate public and environmental impacts.

    Transport Canada requires that all large vessels calling in Canada and all oil handling terminals must have a contract with a certified spill response organization, on the west coast this is Western Canada Marine Response Corporation (WCMRC).

    The Canadian Coast Guard is responsible for monitoring the response and ensuring that it takes place in an efficient manner. WCMRC provides response equipment and personnel trained specifically in responding to oil spills. WCMRC is funded by industry through a tariff charged on petroleum cargos handled in west coast ports. On WCMRC’s website, in the FAQ section you’ll find information about their plans and experience in responding and cleaning up various products.

    In terms of your question about product makeup and diluents, each product has a different makeup, but must meet the specifications of our pipeline. Diluent is light crude, such as synthetic crude (partially refined bitumen) or condensate (light oil recovered through natural gas production). Synthetic crude and condensate on their own have been produced and transported by pipeline for decades. The website www.crudemonitor.ca has very detailed lists of the properties and makeup of Canadian products based on recent samples and also looking at 1 and 5 year averages.
    03 Oct 2013, 06:32 AM

  • EGolds asked

    How deep will the new pipeline be buried where it goes under the Fraser River? What is the depth of the existing pipeline?

    29 Sep 2013, 04:16 PM
    answered
    The existing 24-inch Trans Mountain pipeline across the Fraser River was installed in 2003 using horizontal directional drilling (HDD). The depth of cover below the riverbed is at least 25 metres.
    When looking at river crossings for the proposed Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion, we take into consideration location specific geotechnical conditions, construction techniques and the thickness and coatings on the pipeline, valve locations and other measures that can help protect sensitive environmental areas.
    The final depth of cover for the proposed new 36-inch pipeline will be determined during the detailed designed and engineering phase. However, as the proposed new crossing is at a different location from the existing 24-inch pipeline, the design will take into account the river profile and geotechnical conditions, as well as the diameter of the pipe which also affects pipeline profile. If horizontal directional drilling is used, the depth of cover will be a minimum of 10 metres below the deepest part of the river.
    03 Oct 2013, 02:19 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Has anything been decided about re-routing the pipeline from the area in southwest Edmonton where the pipeline runs within feet of houses in the Royal Gardens and Duggan neighbourhoods?

    20 Sep 2013, 12:40 AM
    answered
    Both Royal Gardens and Duggan are located along the existing Trans Mountain right-of-way.

    We recognize that extensive urban development has been built around the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline right-of-way since it was constructed in the 1950s.

    To minimize impact on urban development, we are proposing to route the Trans Mountain expansion via the South Transportation and Utility Corridor (TUC). The existing Trans Mountain Pipeline will continue to operate in its current location. Both the existing and the proposed pipelines will be part of the same monitoring and integrity management programs.

    A map of the proposed project can be found here.
    24 Sep 2013, 03:46 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Are you responsible at all for the tankers you will be loading the oil into and for any spills or leaks en route or in port?

    17 Sep 2013, 06:30 AM
    answered
    Liability for a marine oil spill depends on the source of the spill:

    Marine Terminal-source spill: If oil were released directly from the Trans Mountain Westridge Terminal, Kinder Morgan would be the Responsible Party. The potential volume and dispersal of a terminal spill is low because tanker loading is a manned operation, there is only a limited amount of oil in the terminal piping at any given time and the water side of the terminal is surrounded by a marine boom whenever a vessel is being loaded. Kinder Morgan would cover the costs of cleaning up such a spill.

    Ship-source spill: If oil were released from a vessel, the vessel owner would be the Responsible Party. In addition to the ship owner’s insurance, there are a variety of funding sources available to cover the costs of cleaning up such a spill.

    Although liability for such spills would not fall to the marine terminal owner, Kinder Morgan has established programs to reduce the potential for ship-source spills. Vessels must pass a rigorous screening process set out by international and local governing bodies and Kinder Morgan before being allowed to accept oil from the Trans Mountain Westridge Terminal. By ensuring that only the safest vessels are filled at Westridge, Kinder Morgan reduces the risk of a ship-source oil spill. You can find more information about marine spill liability here .

    Regulatory and response organizations have established numerous preventative measures for marine traffic, including:
    • Vessels subject to International Maritime Operations requirements, Canada Shipping Act and other federal legislation when in Canadian Waters
    • Vessels must have arrangement with WCMRC for spill response before entering Canadian waters
    • In addition to Trans Mountain’s screening and inspection, the vessel's flag state, vessel charter and insurers conduct inspections before contracting with any ship
    • Port State Control program run by Transport Canada. Includes higher inspection frequency for tankers (first visit, or once per year) and sharing inspection reports under international agreement (Paris Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and Tokyo MOU).
    • Vessels travel well-established traffic lanes managed by US and Canada Coast Guards under scrutiny of marine communication and traffic services from both organizations
    • Port Metro Vancouver regulations and oversight ensure safe conduct of shipping within Vancouver Harbour including passage through First and Second Narrows
    • WCMRC maintains spill response capability for the Port and the coastal waters of BC
    • Loaded vessels have a second pilot on board
    21 Sep 2013, 06:40 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Re proposed TransMountain pipeline expansion: what happens when an earthquake hits BC? How prepared are you? How responsible are you in terms of returning my property or any flora or fauna affected by oil leaked from this pipeline? Up to what dollar value? Are you insured for earthquakes in BC?

    17 Sep 2013, 06:21 AM
    answered
    Historically, pipelines have performed well during earthquakes; however we are committed to reducing earthquake risks to the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline. We proactively assess earthquake hazards, considering advancements in understanding about how pipelines perform during seismic events. Where pipeline or facilities are determined to be at risk of damage from an earthquake, projects are completed to reduce the risk. An example of this work was the replacement of the pipeline crossing of the Fraser River between Surrey and Coquitlam by directional drilling in the mid 2000’s to install the pipeline below susceptible soils.
    Through its experience with managing pipelines in the varied terrain of North America, Kinder Morgan Canada is very aware of the effect of the geologic environment on its pipeline infrastructure. Our Geohazard Management Program is one of the key tools for managing the risks associated with natural hazards to pipeline infrastructure.
    The design team is considering the ground motions that the proposed corridor would experience at any point along its route for an earthquake with a return period of 2475 years, as outlined in the National Building Code of Canada, and are accounting for both subduction and crustal type events.
    More details about our seismic safety measures and plans to ensure the proposed pipeline anticipates and mitigates effects of an earthquake can be found here.
    Trans Mountain is prepared not only for oil releases, but a variety of other emergencies as well, such as fire, security breaches and natural disasters including earthquakes, floods, lightning strikes and avalanches. Teams prepare for these worst-case scenarios using the Trans MountainEmergency Response Plan and the Incident Command System.
    Trans Mountain takes responsibility for the cleanup and remediation of spills by responding immediately to any release from the pipeline system, regardless of size or cause, and with the intent of returning the impacted area to its original state. Trans Mountain may be entitled to recover from insurance funds, or from third parties and their insurance funds if they are legally responsible for causing the spill. Trans Mountain has a comprehensive risk management policy and substantial spill liability insurance to manage the risk of spills.
    To ensure there are sufficient funds to remediate a spill, Trans Mountain is covered by insurance necessary to respond to spills or releases from our pipelines and facilities. Kinder Morgan monitors the insurance program continuously, and makes annual adjustments as necessary to ensure adequate coverage.
    27 Sep 2013, 08:23 AM

  • anonymous asked

    I have a new map showing the KMP in the kamloops area going on the west side of the Lac La June Hwy as a new Ajax Mine proposal is being brought forward to change the location of the Tailings Storage area . Is Kinder Morgan allowing for this possible Ajax mine change in construction as this map shows and assisting their proposal?

    08 Aug 2013, 10:38 AM
    answered
    We are aware of the recent announcement by the Ajax Mine proponent about a change in the project plans. However, we have not yet had an opportunity to review the new plan and learn how it may impact the current Trans Mountain system or the proposed Trans Mountain Expansion Project. Pipeline integrity continues to be our primary priority and we will continue to work with the Ajax mine proponent to ensure the safety of the current and proposed pipeline.
    13 Aug 2013, 08:32 AM

  • leel asked

    The operational clearing over a pipeline is 18m. What is the estimated distance once it is twinned including how far each pipeline is placed from each other.

    22 Jul 2013, 01:51 AM
    answered
    The proposed pipeline will be installed within the existing 18 metre easement for most of the pipeline route. There will be locations where the easement width might be increased due to localized constrictions and, or, ground conditions in order to install, maintain and safely operate the pipelines. On occasion this deviation may require a separate 18 metre easement for the new pipeline.

    The distance between the two pipelines will generally be 6 metres to 9 metres. Offset distance between the pipelines will depend on site-specific construction conditions and proximity to other facilities.
    31 Jul 2013, 02:07 AM

  • Calley asked

    How will it be built to withstand a 9.0 magnitude earthquake in BC's mountains, valley, rivers and lakes?

    21 Jul 2013, 05:00 AM
    answered
    Through its experience with managing pipelines in the varied terrain of North America, Kinder Morgan Canada is very aware of the effect of the geologic environment on its pipeline infrastructure. Our Geohazard Management Program is one of the key tools for managing the risks associated with natural hazards to pipeline infrastructure.

    Historically, pipelines have performed well during earthquakes; however we are committed to reducing earthquake risks to the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline. We proactively assess earthquake hazards, considering advancements in understanding about how pipelines perform during seismic events. Where pipeline or facilities are determined to be at risk of damage from an earthquake, projects are completed to reduce the risk. An example of this work was the replacement of the pipeline crossing of the Fraser River between Surrey and Coquitlam by directional drilling in the mid 2000’s to install the pipeline below susceptible soils.

    Earthquakes with magnitudes around 9.0 have occurred historically off the west coast of Vancouver Island, Washington, Oregon, and northern California. The last such earthquake occurred approximately 300 years ago, and they tend to recur, on average, every 500 years. These great earthquakes are limited to subduction zones off of the west coast of North America. The closest of these is over 100 km west of Vancouver. However, ground-motion intensity dissipates with distance from an earthquake source.

    The largest crustal earthquake expected near the pipeline corridor (Magnitude 7.5) would cause stronger shaking than a distant (Magnitude 9) subduction earthquake. The design team is considering the ground motions that the proposed corridor would experience at any point along its route for an earthquake with a return period of 2475 years, as outlined in the National Building Code of Canada, and are accounting for both the subduction and crustal type events.

    More details about our seismic safety measures and plans to ensure the proposed pipeline design accounts for the possibility of an earthquake can be found on the Seismic Safety page.
    14 Aug 2013, 07:30 AM

  • anonymous asked

    I am in favour of the Kinder Morgan crude oil pipeline expansion project proposal that is yet to be formally filed with the NEB. Can you tell me following its approval and the company using the existing R/W, will Trans Mountain be refurbishing the existing line? It would probably be an appropriate time to refurbish it as the R/W will be significantly disturbed.

    12 Jul 2013, 04:31 AM
    answered
    Trans Mountain conducts ongoing maintenance and upgrades to ensure the safe and environmentally sound operation of the existing pipeline. We use a multi-layered approach to pipeline safety that encompasses integrity management, damage prevention and emergency response programs.
    Our goal for the expansion project is to follow the existing Trans Mountain right-of-way, where practical. We think this can be achieved for 75- 85 per cent of the route. Because we are constantly monitoring and upgrading the existing line, there are no specific plans to do upgrades or maintenance during construction of the new pipeline. However, if, during construction, something of concern is detected on the existing line, we will most certainly address it.
    More information on Pipeline Integrity and our Pipeline Protection Program, can be found here. To learn more about the proposed route for the expansion, visit our Route Plans page.
    16 Jul 2013, 07:22 AM

  • anonymous asked

    How about a pipeline within a pipeline? The inner pipeline caries the oil; the outer acts as shield and catches any spills.

    09 Jul 2013, 03:10 PM
    answered
    Your question has been reviewed by our engineers and there a few main reasons why a pipeline within a pipeline is not preferred, or practical in application.

    Installing a carrier oil pipeline within another pipeline is technically feasible for short distances but impracticable for long pipelines such as the Trans Mountain Pipeline, existing, or proposed. There are additional technical challenges to overcome which would make the manufacturing and installation of the pipes far more challenging. From a lifecycle perspective, the environmental footprint of the new pipeline would be increased considerably due to:
    • Pipe steel tonnage would be more than doubled
    • Increased transportation impacts, as more trains and heavy vehicles would be required to transport the additional weight
    • Increased ground disturbance because a wider, deeper trench would be required to contain a larger diameter casing pipeline
    • Larger right-of-way required for safe installation to construct the pipeline as larger, and more, equipment would be required
    • Increased impact to landowners, other stakeholders and the community in general, because of longer installation time

    New large diameter pipelines, such as Trans Mountain presently installed in Canada, go through 100% inspection, which includes the pipes, welding, external coatings and installation. After inspections, these pipelines rarely have a material, or construction defect left in them that would result in a leak. In addition, these types of pipelines do not suffer from catastrophic failure, if in the unlikely event a leak did occur.

    It makes the operation and maintenance of the pipelines more challenging and could possibly increase the risk of corrosion for the carrier pipeline. Pipelines used to be installed with casings at road and rail crossings, but that practice was stopped due to increased corrosion in these areas, as well as interference with modern internal pipeline inspection tools to find defects at those locations.

    To learn more about our existing pipeline safety and management programs you can visit our Operating & Maintaining our Pipeline page .

    There have been many developments in pipeline technology, which you can learn about here.
    27 Jul 2013, 04:36 AM

  • rds asked

    in areas that have a current pipeline but the twinned pipeline moves to a new route, what happens to the old pipeline?

    01 Jul 2013, 08:40 AM
    answered
    We will continue to operate the existing Trans Mountain pipeline as it exists today. The proposed new line would be an expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and would provide extra capacity for our shippers, and in all but a few specific circumstances, there are no plans to abandon, sell, or change existing Trans Mountain Pipeline operations.
    03 Jul 2013, 05:47 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Is an oil spill response plan in place? If so, does it include the use of toxic dispersants to hide the oil and reduce the fine?

    28 Jun 2013, 06:13 PM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan Canada (KMC) has comprehensive spill response plans in place for its Trans Mountain Pipeline and facilities. These plans are constantly being updated to keep them current and are regularly practiced through deployment exercises.
    Both KMC and every ship visiting our Westridge Marine Terminal are required to have an arrangement with Western Canada Marine Response Corporation (WCMRC), the Transport Canada certified spill response organization for the west coast, who would provide response equipment and personnel services in the event of a spill.
    While the specific strategies used in response to a spill will vary depending on the circumstances, the primary objectives in all cases is to ensure safety and to minimize environmental damage. There are a range of strategies available to achieve these objectives including mechanical recovery (using skimmers), in-situ burning (controlled burning the oil), and dispersion (use of dispersing agents to dilute and disperse the oil reducing its concentration).
    Dispersants are used on oil spills to accelerate the process of natural dispersion. In certain situations, dispersants may help to minimize or prevent damage to important sensitive resources. Dispersant use would be recommended by the Federal, Provincial, Municipal, and First Nations agencies involved in the response and would ultimately need to be approved by Environment Canada.
    Dispersants are not used to hide oil or reduce fines as the question suggests.
    For more information about oil dispersants you can visit the International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Limited’s page on dispersants or see the Department of Fisheries and Oceans website page.
    13 Jul 2013, 07:02 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Who is responsible should your pipes burst? Who is accountable with respects to the destruction of property, the environment, and the entire nation's reputation? What assurance do we have as everyday people, some of us the parents of tomorrow's people, that these pipelines do not lead to disaster and disease and death for our children? Do you really think that disaster cleanup funds really make a difference to us? This pipeline benefits you an unfathomable amount more than us and it would appear that we take bear all the consequences should disaster strike.

    28 Jun 2013, 05:59 PM
    answered
    At Kinder Morgan Canada, we are committed to keeping our pipelines safe, and protecting our employees, the public and the environment. Because safety is at the core of our business, we strive to safeguard our facilities and to meet or exceed all applicable federal, provincial, and local safety regulations.
    Kinder Morgan takes responsibility for first preventing spills and for cleaning up and restoring the environment if there is a spill. While Kinder Morgan takes responsibility, ultimate liability for an oil spill depends on the cause of the spill. Kinder Morgan would cover the costs of a spill clean-up and restoration and depending on the circumstances seek to recover them from insurance or a third party if they were responsible for the spill.
    To ensure there are sufficient funds to remediate a spill, Trans Mountain is covered by insurance necessary to respond to all spills or releases from our pipelines and facilities. Kinder Morgan monitors the insurance program continuously, and makes annual adjustments as necessary to ensure adequate coverage.
    Remediation cleanup criteria have been established by both federal and provincial agencies. As a federally regulated pipeline system, Trans Mountain is required to conduct any clean up to satisfy both the regulations and The National Energy Board. Please visit transmountain.com/canadian-regulations-and-spill for more information on Canadian regulations.
    05 Jul 2013, 02:21 AM

  • grant99 asked

    If the project goes through how many temporary foreign workers will Kinder Morgan bring in? And after the completion, how many be specific, here, how many people will be directly employed with the on going and daily operation the pipeline? Again will they be BC Residents, Alberta Residents or Temporary Foreign workers?

    28 Jun 2013, 01:02 PM
    answered
    Our plans are to maximize local, regional and Aboriginal employment opportunities by working with communities, construction companies and industry associations along the pipeline corridor in BC and Alberta.
    When construction of the project is at its peak, the anticipated workforce will reach up to 4,500 workers. Based on Statistics Canada’s input/output model, this expenditure is estimated to generate 44,200 person-years of employment of which 52% will be generated in British Columbia, 29% will be generated in Alberta, and 10% will be generated in Ontario.
    Other provinces and territories will also experience a positive jobs impact with indirect induced employment as a result of the pipeline construction project. This includes providing materials and equipment such as pipe for the project.
    Following construction, 90 full time jobs will be created, 50 in BC and 40 in Alberta. More information on Trans Mountain jobs can be found here.
    04 Jul 2013, 05:21 AM

  • grant99 asked

    When a spill does happen and it has in the past couple weeks, so we know its not a matter of if but when, will the Kinder Morgan Management team agree to eat seafood from the pacific coast. This is after a spill has happened, and if so will they buy enough seafood to keep the fishing and cruise ship business alive in BC?

    28 Jun 2013, 12:58 PM
    answered
    Trans Mountain has loaded marine vessels since 1956 without a single spill from vessel operations.
    We are an active participant in the maritime community and have a long history of facilitating improvements to regional marine safety. Close collaboration with organizations such as the various Pilotage Authorities, Government organizations (Transport Canada and Canadian Coast Guard) and Port Metro Vancouver ensure that tankers navigate our local waters safely and are guided in and out of the port by highly-trained and qualified Pilots.
    Unlike any other ships, all tankers must adhere to highly-regulated safety protocols when entering BC waters, two experienced pilots on board when tankers are loaded and transiting between Westridge and Victoria, tug escort (tankers are tethered to 3 escort tugs capable of controlling the ship in the event of systems failure), double hulls and segregated tanks.
    In addition to the stringent regulations and requirements of these organizations, Trans Mountain has developed additional safety standards for vessels coming in to Westridge Marine Terminal and can be found here.
    05 Jul 2013, 10:17 AM

  • grant99 asked

    Whats the Burnaby Fire Chief Say about this? Does Burnaby have the equipment to contain and control a fire if it would happen to break out?

    28 Jun 2013, 12:55 PM
    answered
    Although Pipeline incidents are rare, their consequences can be serious. Therefore, we have detailed emergency response plans for all our facilities. The emergency response plans are updated regularly and contain information on emergency procedures, staff roles and responsibilities, and pipeline route maps.
    Emergency response equipment is stationed at various locations along our pipeline routes and trained staff are available around-the-clock to respond in the unlikely event of an emergency.
    Our staff practices emergency response several times a year. Often, the practice drills involve local first responders to ensure an efficient joint response. Regular training provides continual preparedness techniques, equipment and communications. If an emergency occurs, we will immediately mobilize all the necessary resources to minimize its impact on the public and the environment.
    05 Jul 2013, 10:17 AM

  • grant99 asked

    Would Richard D. Kinder allow for a power company to put high voltage power lines over his house? If not then why should we allow pipelines in our communities.

    28 Jun 2013, 12:52 PM
    answered
    Pipelines are the safest and most efficient way of moving oil over land. Twinning the Trans Mountain Pipeline will increase Canada’s capacity to export these resources by facilitating the movement of oil to the West Coast for marine transport to market. It will further secure the supply of oil products to the Lower Mainland for use by BC’s residents and businesses.
    The project will also lead to new jobs in the short and long term, job-related training opportunities, and increases in taxes collected through all three levels of government.
    More information on the importance of pipelines can be found on the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association’s website.
    03 Jul 2013, 05:16 AM

  • grant99 asked

    How do you call this pipeline an expansion when its a new line? An expansion would be digging up the old line and putting a bigger pipe in. This is just a new pipeline.

    28 Jun 2013, 12:50 PM
    answered
    The proposed new line would be an expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline system as it utilizes many of the same facilities or expands upon the same facility footprint, and much (75%-85%) of the same right-of-way along the route from Edmonton to Burnaby.
    In places where land use has changed dramatically since the original line was built in 1953, a new right-of-way will be considered to minimize disruption.
    We will continue to operate the existing Trans Mountain pipeline system as it exists today. For more information about the expansion project, visit this section of our website.
    03 Jul 2013, 05:02 AM

  • de Repus asked

    The Northern Gateway proposal initally factored in "arbitage" as a Company benefit. Appaenntly that odd term means that access to a higher world price will force/allow oil companies to charge much higher fuel prices to us here. Put in the plan to ship oil in the rawest possible form, and not refine it here; and I'm sure we have a significant negative benefit. The question is , are Canadian companies legally bound to consider national interest, especially when it is so odvious?

    28 Jun 2013, 04:01 AM
    answered
    Our project application will be evaluated by the National Energy Board. It is their mandate is to consider Canadian public interest when providing their recommendations to the federal government.
    Therefore, it is in our best interest to also consider this as part of our project plan and application. More information on the NEB and their governance can be found here.
    06 Jul 2013, 02:06 AM

  • Pat asked

    What is the rout of the pipeline through Westridge, Burnaby?

    28 Jun 2013, 03:53 AM
    answered
    More details and maps of the study corridor through Westridge, Burnaby can be found here.
    It is important to note that the final route has not yet been determined, but rather two alternatives for study corridors.
    A study corridor is wider than a pipeline right-of way. Pipelines are installed within a strip of land known as the right-of-way. Before the right-of-way is selected, a study corridor is determined, and studies are undertaken to identify potential routes.
    We're looking for your comments or input about the study corridor we've identified for Westridge, Burnaby. Please review the maps and post your thoughts on this page.
    28 Jun 2013, 09:46 AM

  • Dick asked

    Why is it that people can not accept 50 years or more of operation of the pipeline without a significant negative incident as a sufficient demonstration that the pipeline is operated responsibly, and that the risk of accident (while always present) is small. I am personally happy to leave the design and operation of the pipeline expansion to those who have demonstrated that they know what they are doing. Dick Hermann

    25 Jun 2013, 09:44 AM
    answered
    We are committed to keeping our pipelines safe, and protecting our employees, the public and the environment. Because safety is at the core of our business, we strive to safeguard our facilities and to meet or exceed all applicable federal, provincial, state and local safety regulations.
    We know there are risks with any form of transportation, and while pipelines have proven to be the safest from of transportation for oil, there is always a risk a spill may occur.
    To ensure the continued safe and reliable operation demonstrated over the past 60 years, we use a multi-layered approach to pipeline safety that encompasses integrity management, damage prevention and emergency response programs. More details about our current pipeline integrity program can be found here.
    03 Jul 2013, 04:36 AM

  • lisbeth asked

    Why do companies pipeline the bitumen instead of a much safer product through the pipelines? If the buyers don't want to buy refined oil from us, then to my mind it is our loss and all these other Countries that gain. I'm shaking my head wondering why we allow other Countries to dictate what we ship through our pipelines. Ship a safer product and build more refineries so that Canadians benefit instead of foreign Countries. I'm against shipping Bitumen but the only saving grace in this, is that your company has been doing it for 50 yrs.

    23 Jun 2013, 10:19 AM
    answered
    Transporting diluted bitumen is as safe as transporting other types of crude oil. This is because there is virtually no difference between the two products.
    Our industry has been safely transporting diluted bitumen in pipelines for over 30 years and conventional crude for over 60 years.
    The Trans Mountain pipeline transports crude oil, semi-refined and refined products – for use in local markets and for export – on behalf of its customers. In the same way a highway does not own the cars travelling on it, Trans Mountain does not own the product it transports. Any product moved in the pipeline must meet Kinder Morgan Canada’s tariff requirements. These are the specifications that must be followed in order for the product to be moved in the Trans Mountain Pipeline.
    25 Jun 2013, 08:51 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Will the existing pipeline and pumping infrastructure be upgraded with the installation of the new pipeline?

    23 Jun 2013, 09:07 AM
    answered
    Although the Trans Mountain Pipeline was built in the 1950’s, the pipeline is fully capable to continue safely operating and efficiently delivering product to our customers because of Kinder Morgan Canada’s efforts in ongoing maintenance and implementation of technology advancements.
    The most recent expansion project took place between 2006 and 2008 with the construction of 13 new pump stations and modifications to existing stations along the route.
    The current proposal intends for 11 new pump stations to be built and the existing stations along the route to be expanded. Additional storage capacity would be added to existing storage terminals in Burnaby, Sumas, and Edmonton as well as the Westridge Marine Terminal.
    25 Jun 2013, 07:59 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Why cannot not be located under the power lines, which primarily go through fields and not under schools and private homes. Primarily I am against it but in the event it proceeds I believe it should be located in the least damaging area. I am not sure I am happy with the answer to when a pipeline bursts and damages a home. Renovation could very well not be the answer as still located on the site of the toxicity.

    21 Jun 2013, 04:42 AM
    answered
    The proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline line is to follow the existing route between Edmonton and Burnaby that has been in operation since 1953, where practical. Trans Mountain recognizes that many regional changes have occurred since the pipeline was installed 60 years ago and patterns of land use have changed with the growth of communities.
    Trans Mountain is listening to Aboriginal peoples, landowners and stakeholders and will consider deviating from the existing route while balancing operational, engineering, environmental, community and economic factors.
    Visit the Have Your Say page and find out more information about routing through your specific community.
    22 Jun 2013, 07:14 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Will the upgraded line include a return path for condensates or are you planning to ship dilbit from the Burnaby terminal or otherwise use the condensates in West Coast refineries?

    21 Jun 2013, 02:05 AM
    answered
    The proposed Expansion Project does not include a return path for condensates because the product is provided by the customers ready to transport - we do not add or remove any diluent. For the most part, the diluent is shipped along with the bitumen, or other crude oil products to the shipper's desired destination where it would become part of the refining process.
    While the products in our pipeline belong to the customer, they must meet our specifications and tariff requirements. Kinder Morgan Canada's tariff rules and regulations are published here.
    You can also learn about the products shipped in Trans Mountain’s pipeline on the Product Shipped in a Pipeline page.
    21 Jun 2013, 07:18 AM

  • anonymous asked

    How many Emergency shut off valves(ESVs) are on the new line. what automatic safety trips are on the ESVs, and is there a override on the safety trips. If there was a leak in the line, and the pipeline shutdown and the ESVs closed, what would be the largest possible spill volume? thanks.....Dave

    18 Jun 2013, 07:22 AM
    answered
    The number of Emergency Shutoff Valves (ESVs) for the proposed line has not yet been determined. The number and locations of ESVs will be guided by modeling studies that factor in local conditions and potential consequences. As we do our detailed design and engineering work the final locations of the valves will be designed to protect sensitive areas and minimize impacts that are identified in our routing and design process.
    The best way to shut a pipeline down in an emergency is to isolate upstream of the location and continue pumping away from it on the downstream side. In order to do this, an operator at our Control Centre receives the alarms and uses their training and knowledge of the specific situation to shut down the pipeline in a way that can best minimize impacts.
    There are a number of factors that impact the volume of a spill, including the type of product in the line, terrain elevations and distance between ESVs. We calculate worst-case spill volumes for emergency response planning purposes to ensure that adequate response resources are available.
    21 Jun 2013, 06:21 AM

  • anonymous asked

    In construction of TMOPL, Jan.-Feb. 1953, the line was laid cross the Thompson River, near Fulton Field airport (Kamloops). According to the Kamloops Daily Sentinel, April 1957 saw a 2nd line laid across the river from the Kamloops Pumping Station to Barriere. How many TMOPL lines presently cross the river at this location? Is one of the two lines presently "inactive"? Will the present request for expansion by Kinder Morgan mean a new line would cross the Thompson River in the present location of the previous two lines? Neil

    18 Jun 2013, 01:57 AM
    answered
    Trans Mountain currently has two pipelines installed beneath the Thompson River at the crossing next to the Kamloops Airport. The original 24” diameter pipeline installed during the initial construction of the pipeline in 1953 and a 30” diameter pipeline that was installed during a previous expansion in 1957. Currently, the 30” pipeline is in service as part of the Trans Mountain pipeline and the original 24” pipeline is inactive.
    A new 36” diameter pipeline is planned to be installed as part of the proposed Trans Mountain Expansion. The new pipeline is planned to be installed adjacent the two legacy pipelines. A new larger pipeline is required because neither of the existing pipelines is able to meet the capacity requirements of the proposed expansion.
    Unlike the trenched crossing installed in the 1950’s, the new crossing of Thompson River is planned to be completed using the modern technique of a horizontal directional drill (HDD). Pending favourable results from ongoing geotechnical investigations, a HDD of the river will not require any disturbance of the river bed or river banks, as the drill path will start and end several hundred metres on either side of the rivers edge.
    Upon completion of the expansion project, the status of the two existing legacy pipelines would remain as they are today, the 30” pipeline continuing to be used by the legacy line and the 24” pipeline inactive.
    18 Jun 2013, 08:43 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Is the old pipeline still going to be used or will it be abandoned? Thw pipeline goes through my back yard and I'm wondering if there will be any changes to the exsisting easment

    17 Jun 2013, 06:08 AM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan will continue to operate the existing Trans Mountain pipeline as it does today. The proposed new line would be an expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and would provide extra capacity for our shippers, and in all but a few specific circumstances, there are no plans to abandon, sell, or change existing Trans Mountain Pipeline operations.
    18 Jun 2013, 04:23 AM

  • anonymous asked

    IF THE PIPELINE NEAR MY HOUSE BURSTS AND DESTROYS THE VALUE OF MY PROPERTY, WILL YOU PAY FOR MY NEW $350,000 HOUSE IN VICTORIA?

    15 Jun 2013, 02:44 AM
    answered
    In the event of a spill, Kinder Morgan Canada would attempt to return any affected properties to an equivalent or better condition than existed before the spill. These efforts could include landscaping, and interior and exterior renovations, if applicable.
    An example of restoration and remediation efforts can be found here.
    18 Jun 2013, 04:07 AM

  • anonymous asked

    http://www.ctvnews.ca/business/transmountain-pipeline-in-merritt-b-c-shut-down-after-small-leak-1.1324345 Where are the guarantees?

    14 Jun 2013, 06:34 AM
    answered
    While there are no guarantees, Trans Mountain has worked hard to develop a mature suite of programs to maximize the safety of the pipeline. It was while performing regular maintenance that we found this leak.
    These pipeline safety practices focus on preventing pipeline failures and minimizing their impact. They are all part of what is known as a Pipeline Integrity Management program. This program identifies all of the hazards that have the potential to affect the safety of the pipeline system and ensures that control measures are implemented to prevent or mitigate the occurrence and potential impact of each hazard.
    Additionally, we have plans to ensure we are able to respond in the event of an incident like this one. Emergency response plans are constantly being updated to keep them current. The plans are location specific, identify locations of emergency response materials and equipment, and are regularly practiced through field deployment exercises. Because of this planning, we are able to be quickly contain any spilled material and immediately begin clean up and remediation.
    As part of an ongoing commitment to safety and environmental protection, Trans Mountain takes responsibility for the cleanup and remediation of spills and we work with pre-qualified and trained consultants and contractors to ensure any spill is cleaned up as quickly as possible while ensuring the safety of the public and minimizing impacts to the environment.
    15 Jun 2013, 02:34 AM

  • anonymous asked

    My question is, What type of pump station is near Hope BC? How do you power the station for the oil to go through the pipelines? Are you using micr-hydro, or wind, solar, or burning gas? which one

    06 Jun 2013, 03:58 AM
    answered
    The Trans Mountain Pipeline pump station, in Hope, B.C., is similar to other pump stations along the pipeline - it has two electrically-powered centrifugal pump units.
    Electrical supply for the Hope station is obtained from BC Hydro, who generates much of their electricity with hydroelectric installations around the province.
    07 Jun 2013, 02:20 PM

  • anonymous asked

    How many people does Kinder Morgan currently employ in Canada?

    04 Jun 2013, 02:48 AM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan Canada employs more than 350 people, not including contractors. To learn more about Kinder Morgan in Canada visit transmountain.com/about-kinder-morgan-can.
    05 Jun 2013, 07:32 AM

  • CPC asked

    When the proposed TUC section is operational, will Kinder Morgan discontinue use of the current urban pipeline? Will it be abandoned, sold to another operator, or what?

    28 May 2013, 10:55 PM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan will continue to operate the existing Trans Mountain pipeline in Edmonton, and throughout the line, as it does today. The proposed new line would be an expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and would provide extra capacity for our shippers. There are currently no plans to abandon, sell, or change existing Trans Mountain Pipeline operations.
    31 May 2013, 02:09 AM

  • anonymous asked

    I have heard from many that the oil from the pipeline proposed to run from AB to Kitimat will not be refined in Canada, but sent to another country (China) to be refined and then sent back to us, costing us more money. If this is true, why? What good does that do for Canada and future jobs in BC? Does anyone understand how dangerous it is to send unrefined over an ocean? The idea to help other countries economies is nice, but sooner or later our lack of aggressiveness will bite us in the butt.

    27 May 2013, 02:37 AM
    answered
    Just to clarify, the Trans Mountain Pipeline currently runs from Alberta to Burnaby, B.C. with the proposed expansion project paralleling the existing route, where practical. Neither the existing pipeline nor the proposed pipeline goes to Kitimat.
    We transport both refined and unrefined products in our pipeline – both for use in local markets and for export. Trans Mountain has been safely loading unrefined petroleum products on to marine vessels from at our Burnaby facility since the 1950’s.
    Expanding the Trans Mountain Pipeline system will create both short and long term job opportunities in B.C communicates along the pipeline route and result in increased tax revenues for local and provincial governments. For more about benefits for B.C., click here.
    29 May 2013, 08:39 AM

  • anonymous asked

    1. Why not avoid the lower mainland and choose a more direct route west to Ptince Rupert area? There are other markets in the world other than the USA. 2. Why are Canadian Gasoline prices so high?

    24 May 2013, 03:15 AM
    answered
    The proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline line is to follow the existing route between Edmonton and Burnaby that has been in operation since 1953, where practical.
    This is known as a “Brownfield” project — whereas completely new pipelines are known as “Greenfield” projects. This approach to routing provides a number of advantages.
    The need for new pipeline corridors would be reduced because the existing corridor would be expanded, and construction and operating activities would occur along an existing right-of-way. Portions of the existing right-of-way could also be used during construction, reducing the area disturbed. Visit this page for more information.
    Gasoline prices are affected by a large number of global factors. The prices of crude oil are neither controlled nor directly influenced by the development of any specific pipeline.
    There are some valuable resources online that explain the factors that influence gas prices, including the following links:
    - NEB web page
    - CAPP web page
    31 May 2013, 11:57 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Is there really going to be any weight given to citizen feedback? Isn't economic homeostasis simply to satisfy the most convenient and cost reduced desires of big industry at the price which cannot be measured in eco-destructive (referred to as economic construction) projects such as this?

    23 May 2013, 11:35 PM
    answered
    Public input is an important part of any major pipeline project, and will form a critical component of our application. We are reaching out to all landowners along the pipeline and meeting with community leaders, elected officials, environmental groups and Aboriginal Peoples to get their input, issues and perspective. To date we have received feedback that has been very helpful in our planning and will ensure we can make the project better.
    Community engagement began in April 2012 and will continue through 2013 as part of the preparations for our Facilities Application to the National Energy Board (NEB), expected to be filed in late 2013. The Facilities Application asks the NEB for permission to build the necessary facilities associated with the proposed expansion project. Engagement and consultation will also continue through the lifetime of the project.
    To find out how you can give feedback now, and throughout the process, visit our feedback forum.
    For more information on how public input is used, visit Trans Mountain’s Using Your Feedback page.
    31 May 2013, 02:07 PM

  • anonymous asked

    Why aren't we preparing for the post-carbon world that our children need to stay alive as the runaway climate change threshold is fast approaching? Why are we building pipelines that serve to accelerate an already disastrous watershed operation in northern Alberta? Please rethink your business, if not for sake of your own children.

    22 May 2013, 03:17 PM
    answered
    Trans Mountain pipeline has a 60 year history of safe and responsible operations. We are designing a project that will account for our impact on communities, our environment and our economy.
    A comprehensive assessment of our work will be available in the Environmental Socio-Economic Assessment (ESA) when we file our facilities application to the National Energy Board.
    Climate change and water use are an important issues which Canada’s oil industry have addressed through many activities. A lot has changed in the last fifty years and there are some great resources on the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) website about climate and water. As well as on the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association (CEPA) website .
    29 May 2013, 05:40 AM

  • Ernie asked

    If the trans Canada pipeline does go through, how will I as a consumer benefit from this? Will gas prices be reduced at the pumps for all Canadians? Will the pricing of gas be filtered down at the pumps?

    21 May 2013, 02:53 AM
    answered
    We cannot speak to the Trans Canada Pipeline but we can speak to our project which is the expansion of the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline from Edmonton, AB to Burnaby, BC.
    The Trans Mountain Expansion Project will provide municipal and provincial taxes, as well as jobs, among other benefits. For detailed information about the ways in which the Trans Mountain pipeline will benefit Canadians, please visit transmountain.com/benefits.
    With respect to gasoline prices, these are affected by a large number of global factors. The prices of crude oil are neither controlled nor directly influenced by the development of any specific pipeline. There are some valuable resources online that explain the factors that influence gas prices, including the following two links:
    1) NEB web page 2) CAPP web page
    23 May 2013, 05:21 AM

  • anonymous asked

    What has been TM's operational performance in terms of safety, spills, leakages, cleanup, and remediation over the past 60 years? A comparison of regulatory jurisdictions, as given in NEB reports on your website is not helpful in enabling the public to adequately assess the performance history of KM in operating the existing 60-year old pipeline.

    16 May 2013, 08:37 AM
    answered
    As a regulated company, we are responsible for reporting spills greater than 1.5 m3 to the National Energy Board (NEB). Since The National Energy Board started regulating pipelines in 1961 there have been approximately 78 reported incidents on the Trans Mountain pipeline system. These reported incidents are broken down as follows:
    - 61 incidents involving crude oil
    - 7 involving gasoline, jet fuel, diesel and other types of oil
    - 4 involving water
    - 5 involving other products not listed above
    - 1 did not involve any product
    Approximately 70% of these incidents occurred at terminals or pump stations and the remainder occurred along the pipeline right-of-way. For a detailed list of the release incidents, please see our Spill History page.
    Additionally, the following pages provide information on our most serious spills in the last decade; they discuss real spill details, remediation, and lessons learned:
    - 2005 Ward Road incident
    - 2007 Westridge incident
    - 2008 Burnaby Tank 82 incident
    - 2012 Abbotsford Tank 121 incident
    22 May 2013, 01:37 AM

  • anonymous asked

    If a pipeline is going to run throughout our city, this doubtless means you have to disturb our surrounding ecosystems. Is their a plan to fix this issue? Canada has diverse species that bring in travellers from all over the world, pipelines will likely destroy that which is beloved by locals and tourists. Even small disturbances can lead to large interruptions in our environment.

    12 May 2013, 12:36 AM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan Canada is fully committed to environmental management, protection and stewardship of the land during the construction and operation of all its facilities.
    A comprehensive environmental and socio-economic assessment will be completed for the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. There will be over 30 environmental surveys completed by local and regional biologists and resource specialists.
    The results of the surveys will be incorporated into an application to be submitted to the National Energy Board (NEB) for review and approval. Species of special status and their habitats will be identified and assessed as part of this project.
    Through the development of thousands of kilometers of pipelines, there have been a number of mitigation strategies developed that can be employed to minimize impacts to wildlife and wildlife habitat. These can range from avoiding important wildlife periods through the timing of construction to conducting detailed surveys immediately prior to construction.
    Pipeline construction is a sequential series of activities which do not remain in one area for an extended period of time. A detailed Environmental Protection Plan will be submitted to the NEB as part of the application which will document every linear metre of the construction right-of-way and mitigation strategies to help avoid or minimize environmental impacts from construction.
    Where practical, the route will remain within the existing right-of-way, which will minimize new disturbances to ecological communities.
    14 May 2013, 08:33 AM

  • Energy+ asked

    What are you doing to engage the BC provincial government? Christy Clarke seems not to be a willing partner in these pipeline projects unless she can hold the various stakeholders ransom for extra revenue.

    09 May 2013, 03:33 AM
    answered
    Since announcing our intention to pursue the project in April 2012, we’ve engaged with thousands of people through one on one meetings, 37 public information sessions and ongoing opportunities online and in-person. We are committed to engaging with governments, community leaders, land owners, Aboriginal groups - including the provincial government.
    With a project of this size and nature that touches 15 B.C. ridings along the pipeline route and 25 ridings along the marine corridor, we expect and welcome a high degree of public interest. It is important we provide timely and accurate information to all interested, including Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs), relevant government ministers, opposition critics and public office holders along our pipeline and marine corridors.
    The MLAs representing communities potentially affected by the Project have been sent information packages and have been invited to attend community open houses and workshops.
    10 May 2013, 01:41 AM

  • Mike Sampson asked

    what would the duration of construction be until pipeline through-put would commence, timeline please

    08 May 2013, 06:13 PM
    answered
    Stakeholder engagement was kicked off in late spring/early summer of 2012, and will be ongoing through 2014. June 2012 through Spring 2014 will also see Kinder Morgan undertaking comprehensive pipeline routing studies, traditional knowledge studies, and environmental and socio-economic assessments.
    A comprehensive facilities application will be filed with the National Energy Board (NEB) in late 2013. The NEB will conduct a regulatory review of this application through 2015 and pending approval of the project, pipeline construction is anticipated to begin in 2016 and to be completed in 2017. The proposed operations start date is for 2017.
    For a visual of this timeline, please visit transmountain.com/timeline.
    09 May 2013, 07:32 AM

  • Carli C asked

    Is there an open house planned for the Edson/Yellowhead County area?

    08 May 2013, 12:46 PM
    answered
    We held a series of 37 Information Sessions to introduce the project along the pipeline and marine corridors last fall and winter, including one in Edson in October 2012.
    We have recently launched new public engagement opportunities. In this phase we are seeking feedback on the selected study corridor area for the pipeline and how it might affect communities. All pipeline communities have the opportunity to see the selected study corridors and provide feedback through this website, the Edson pages can be found here.
    In some areas where the pipeline route has changed, we will be hosting public Open Houses. Open Houses will be held in Hinton on May 15 and in Edmonton on May 16. Stakeholders are encouraged to attend either session or participate by joining the conversation or providing input through this website.
    Additionally, we plan on hosting another series of Information Sessions in the Fall of 2013, prior to filing an National Energy Board (NEB) Application, and we anticipate one would be in held in the Edson area. Upcoming events will be posted on transmountain.com and advertised locally.
    We encourage you to participate online today by registering and providing your feedback about the Edson area.
    10 May 2013, 01:39 AM

  • anonymous asked

    can I bid on your work through core and is net? I realy would like to do so and who can I contact for light load hotshots?

    05 May 2013, 08:30 PM
    answered
    We are in the early stages of the proposed Trans Mountain Expansion Pipeline Project and are still a few years away from securing vendor opportunities. We appreciate hearing from you and will add your name to our list of interested suppliers. As more information becomes available, it will be posted on this website.
    You can also sign up for updates about supplier or vendor opportunities here.
    09 May 2013, 07:03 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Will TransMtn use clac, non-union or unionized contractors for the construction of the mainline pipeline?

    20 Apr 2013, 01:59 AM
    answered
    As the Trans Mountain Pipeline is still a few years away from construction, contractors have not yet been secured for the construction phase of the Project. Trans Mountain is consulting with Unions, Association, Communities and Contractors to develop a strategy that will encourage and benefit local employment.
    23 Apr 2013, 02:50 AM

  • Cam asked

    Response to the question in January indicates the preferred Kinder Morgan on route through Edmonton is not confirmed had not yet been released. When do you expect that to happen (assuming it has not already). Thank you.

    13 Apr 2013, 01:16 PM
    answered
    Information on the proposed Trans Mountain expansion route in Edmonton and how the route decision-making process works will be available in mid May.
    We will be providing materials for comment online between May 8 and May 29, 2013 and holding a public open house on May 16, 2013. If you would like us to notify you when this information becomes available, please register on the website here.
    18 Apr 2013, 05:29 AM

  • anonymous asked

    I worked in the oil industry from Alberta to the middle east for over 40 years, I never until 2 days ago heard the term "dilbit" as an abbreviation of 'diluted bitumen'.

    13 Apr 2013, 04:13 AM
    answered
    "Dilbit” is used and defined by the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP).
    Their publication entitled Alberta Oil Sands Bitumen Valuation Methodology (2013) defines “dilbit blends” as “blends made from heavy crudes and/or bitumens and a diluents usually condensate, for the purpose of meeting pipeline viscosity and density specifications, where the density of the diluents included in the blend is less than 800 kg/m3”.
    The term was coined in the 1980’s when the process of diluting bitumen using diluents to facilitate transportation by pipeline was developed.
    17 Apr 2013, 05:28 PM

  • anonymous asked

    Will there be an increase in capacity or any proposed upgrades and improvements to be preformed to the Washington State branch supplying Refineries in Whatcom County? Have any proposed upgrades or increase in capacity been addressed with Washington communities and land owners?

    05 Apr 2013, 05:40 AM
    answered
    Trans Mountain is exploring upgrades to the Puget Sound system to increase capacity from 170,000 barrels per day (bpd) to 225,000 bpd to meet refinery demand. Facility improvements could include a new pump station and additional meters at our existing Anacortes and Ferndale facilities. These proposed plans are dependent on the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project in Canada being approved. Information about proposed upgrades will be discussed with local communities and landowners as plans are developed.
    11 Apr 2013, 02:44 PM

  • anonymous asked

    Has an alternate rout been determined to circumvent the proposed Ajax mine site in Kamloops ? If so where would the route be and if not how will the pipeline remain safe should the mine receive approval?

    19 Mar 2013, 10:06 AM
    answered
    We are aware of the proposed Ajax Mine Project and the proximity of the proposed project footprint to the existing pipeline. We have been in discussion with KGHMI to more fully understand the scope and extent of the mine development and mine site operations, and to ensure the continued integrity of the existing pipeline operation as well as the proposed Trans Mountain Expansion Project.
    As a primary routing objective, where practical the routing of the proposed expansion will remain within the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline right-of-way. Extensive consultation, studies, and environmental and socio-economic assessments will help determine the best routing options for the proposed expanded Trans Mountain Pipeline.
    With respect to the Ajax mine location and potential impacts of the mine development, these considerations will apply to both the existing pipeline as well as the new proposed pipeline.
    23 Mar 2013, 09:57 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Please, could you tell me, if there is a leak of oil from your pipeline (present and proposed future line), precisely how much money are you obligated to spend in repair of the line and cleaning up the oil spilled and returning the affected area to its original state?

    15 Mar 2013, 10:24 AM
    answered
    Trans Mountain takes responsibility for the cleanup and remediation of spills by responding immediately to any release from the pipeline system, regardless of size or cause, and with the intent of returning the impacted area to its original state.
    Trans Mountain may be entitled to recover from insurance funds, or from third parties and their insurance funds if they are legally responsible for causing the spill. Trans Mountain has a comprehensive risk management policy and substantial spill liability insurance to manage the risk of spills. With the proposed expansion a review of spill liability insurance requirements is planned.
    23 Mar 2013, 09:59 AM

  • JJM asked

    In addition to Jasper National Park, what other protected areas does the proposed pipeline expansion run through? What policy arrangements make it possible for the pipeline to go through these areas, and which policies for Jasper National Park needed to be amended for the expansion?

    12 Mar 2013, 04:29 AM
    answered
    The Trans Mountain pipeline was constructed in 1952-53 and traverses nine parks and protected areas in BC, one in Alberta and one National Park. With the exceptions of Jasper National Park and Mount Robson Provincial Park, the installation of the pipeline predated the establishment and designation of the parks under the BC Park Act and Alberta Provincial Parks Act. Trans Mountain has been operating and maintaining its pipeline in these parks and protected areas for over 60 years.
    In 1951 a Government of Canada Order In Council was granted for Jasper National Park and in 1952 a BC Order In Council was granted for Mount Robson Provincial Park. These orders allowed for the construction and operation of the pipeline, and included a provision for future considerations of multiple pipeline rights in the right-of-way. The multiple pipeline rights allowed the environmental assessment to proceed and ultimately approval of the construction of the TMX Anchor Loop project. As part of the approval to construct the TMX Anchor Loop, Trans Mountain relinquished its rights to construct through Jasper National Park in the future. Many other net benefits to the parks were developed as a result of the construction. Please visit: www.transmountain.com/anchor-loop for a discussion and story of the Alberta Emerald Award-winning project.
    A Boundary Amendment application, BC Parks Impact Assessment and a legislative amendment was required to complete the construction of TMX Anchor Loop through Mount Robson Provincial Park. Lands were temporarily removed from the park to allow for construction and lands were then returned back to the park after construction to ensure no net loss in total park area. An operations BC Park Use Permit allows Trans Mountain to maintain and operate the pipelines. All applicable federal and provincial permit approvals are required to conduct routine operations and maintenance activities in the parks and protected areas.
    Although the Trans Mountain Expansion Project does not involve pipeline construction in either Jasper National Park or Mount Robson Provincial Park, the planned reactivation of a deactivated 24 inch diameter pipeline segment from Hinton, Alberta to Hargreaves, British Columbia will require installation of automated mainline block valves. This was a commitment that Trans Mountain made to Parks Canada and BC Parks as a part of the TMX Anchor Loop Project approval.
    Routing studies and environmental field programs are currently underway for the Trans Mountain Expansion Project, consequently, specific parks crossed by the proposed pipeline have not yet been identified. In the event any provincial parks are crossed by the selected route, a Boundary Adjustment application will be prepared and submitted to BC Parks, and any other necessary regulatory approvals, permits and/or authorizations will be sought.
    14 Mar 2013, 08:42 AM

  • AlanJ asked

    How many staff monitored the pipeline right-of-way when it was operated by TransMountain and how many staff are performing the same tasks with Kinder Morgan today?

    05 Mar 2013, 12:51 PM
    answered
    Our control centre operators in Edmonton monitor the pipeline 24 hours per day, seven days a week, 365 days a year using a sophisticated leak detection system as well as pressure and flow alarms and are prepared to shut the pipeline down immediately if there is any indication of a potential problem on the pipeline. The number of operators monitoring the TransMountain system is increased from the number before Kinder Morgan acquired the pipeline in 2005.
    In 2007, two years after the acquisition of TransMountain by Kinder Morgan, our field workforce was restructured to create a Pipeline Protection department with the sole purpose of monitoring construction activity near our pipeline and preventing damage to our pipeline by third parties working near the line. As part of this restructuring we added a full time dedicated manager and a full time ground patroller in the Lower Mainland, bringing the total complement of Pipeline Protection personnel to sixteen.
    We also monitor the right of way with aerial patrols using a helicopter. We have restructured these patrols in the last few years to patrol the line more frequently in areas where there is a high level of construction activity and potential risk of line damage, such as in the Lower Mainland.
    13 Mar 2013, 08:44 AM

  • anonymous asked

    When you say the tankers are only partially loaded, what does that mean? Are they half full or 95% full? Is it only the Aframax tankers that are partially loaded? Is it less economic to run these tankers below capacity?

    02 Mar 2013, 02:33 AM
    answered
    Aframax tankers will be loaded to a maximum 80 to 90 percent of their total capacity. The departure draft of any tanker loading at Westridge Terminal is controlled by the maximum allowed to transit the Second Narrows as regulated by Port Metro Vancouver, and is dependent on the actual depth of high water levels on the day of departure. Destination port restrictions is the other limiting factor when it comes to loading tankers, as they may have lower limits than Port Metro Vancouver.
    06 Mar 2013, 08:12 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Traffic expansion in Vancouver Harbor seems very controversial. Are there any other contingencies under consideration should traffic expansion in Vancouver Harbor be denied?

    25 Feb 2013, 10:30 AM
    answered
    While we have considered alternatives to the proposed expansion of the existing marine terminal at Westridge, we have not yet found any compelling enough to justify a deviation from what is an existing corridor for petroleum transportation.
    The Trans Mountain pipeline and marine loading facility has been operating safely since 1953. Today about 5 tankers per month are loaded at Westridge which represents less than 3% of the total traffic in Port Metro Vancouver (PMV).
    If the expansion proceeds this could increase up to 34 tankers per month which would be about 14% of total traffic. While the project involves an increase in the frequency of tankers calling at Westridge, the size of the tankers is not proposed to change.
    Rules for safe tanker operation in the harbour are established by Port Metro Vancouver and these limit the maximum size of tankers that can call at Westridge to the Aframax class and these are only partially loaded. In addition, loaded tankers are required to have two licensed BC Coast pilots and to be tethered to large escort tugs when transiting through the harbour.
    01 Mar 2013, 04:36 AM

  • anonymous asked

    At the fall meeting in Kamloops,I was told that the pipe in my area was not going to be dug up and enlarged. Has that changed since this most recent announcement of expansion on the pipeline and its capacity,this week? I live north of the McLure Ferry on Westsyde Rd. I would please like a definate answer of yes or no. T hank-you

    19 Jan 2013, 01:10 PM
    answered
    The area you are referring to is in a reactivation zone for which no new construction is planned at this time. Reactivation of the existing line may require some digs on a localized basis in order to examine the condition of the pipe and to repair anomalies as necessary. In these locations, our land agents will work with landowners to determine an appropriate strategy.
    22 Jan 2013, 06:40 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Since bitumen is basically just oil despite the disinformation spread by (largely US foundation-funded) professional eco-agents, and Canada's oil sands contributes just 1/1000 (and Canada overall contributes only two percent) to global greenhouse gas emissions (and, in fact US coal-fired power plants contribute 28 times more GHGs to global emissions), and even Greenpeace co-founder Dr. Patrick Moore defends oil sands reclamation and resource necessity, why are so many people so misinformed that they march and protest etc.?

    18 Jan 2013, 03:56 AM
    answered
    Climate change is an important issue for our country. There are many misconceptions about the efforts being made by Canada’s oil industry to address the climate impact of its activities.
    A lot has changed in the last fifty years and there are some great resources on the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) website and Canadian Energy Pipeline Association (CEPA) website.
    We have also identified many misconceptions about diluted bitumen (dilbit) and how it behaves. Dilbit has been moving through Trans Mountain Pipeline for close to 30 years. It is not handled differently than other heavy oils; however the industry is doing more to explore how diluted bitumen behaves in the environment many past studies are posted to our website.
    27 Jan 2013, 03:34 PM

  • anonymous asked

    i know that routes are still being evaluated but would it not make sense to fast track the edmonton work and possibly retire a portion of the existing line?atco is moving this year to realign a lot of their stuff in the tuc where practicable. also,is there a chance more product could move south via pipe before it hits the port or is the whole project viable only if "tanked" out.

    16 Jan 2013, 05:32 PM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan is aware that land use has changed significantly in areas of Edmonton surrounding the Trans Mountain Pipeline right-of-way since the completion of the original line in 1953.
    Kinder Morgan is not likely to use the existing Trans Mountain right-of-way for the proposed expansion project in Edmonton but cannot eliminate the possibility until an alternative route is confirmed. Alternative routing options are being assessed along the north and south portions of Edmonton’s Transportation/Utility Corridor (TUC) and information regarding the preferred route through Edmonton will be made public in due course.
    While the new line is likely to follow the TUC, Kinder Morgan is not contemplating relocating the existing Trans Mountain pipeline in Edmonton.
    To answer your second question, some products from the Trans Mountain pipeline do currently flow south to Washington State through the Puget Sound Pipeline which connects the Trans Mountain Pipeline into Washington State, while some are delivered into Kamloops and the Vancouver area in British Columbia, rather than being sent to the Westridge Terminal Facility for transportation by tanker. The expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline will provide extra capacity for all three of these markets.
    Today the Puget Sound Pipeline, which supplies four refineries in Washington State, has some spare capacity and we expect that more Canadian crude will be used in Washington State over time but the potential growth of that market alone does not support the expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline which is being proposed.
    18 Jan 2013, 06:53 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Your person directed me to this site at mtg on salt spring today...I wanted to know who is the general partner and who are the limited partners in the km pipeline...also would like to know the twelve customers signed up and how much bitumen from each

    13 Jan 2013, 01:38 PM
    answered
    The general partner of Trans Mountain Pipeline L.P. is Trans Mountain Pipeline ULC. The list of thirteen customers is contained in the Press Release that was issued on January 10, 2013 and can be found here. Or the TM website here.
    Other specific information requested related to customer volumes of product is confidential. For more information please visit kindermorgan.com and transmountain.com/about-us
    22 Jan 2013, 04:09 PM

  • anonymous asked

    Why does all your promotional info never include the word bitumen or 'dilbit' as one of the stuff you pump through your pipes instead using words like heavy oil or synthetic crude, bitumen being neither?

    12 Jan 2013, 06:56 AM
    answered
    DilBit is a type of heavy oil, a generic classification of crude oils with a density between 904 and 940 kilograms per cubic metre. While DilBit refers to bitumen which has been diluted with condensate, there are also other blends.
    Bitumen on its own does not meet pipeline specifications for transport as defined in our Tariff and must be diluted with other petroleums to meet these specifications (i.e. density and viscosity). Some other types of heavy oil are SynBit (Bitumen blended with Synthetic), or even DilSynBit (bitumen diluted with both condensate and synthetic oil). The term Heavy Oil is consistent with our tariff treatment of all these sub-types.
    22 Jan 2013, 04:11 PM

  • anonymous asked

    How much diluted bitumen from the Alberta Tarsands will be shipped annually though this pipeline and shipped out of Burnaby in tankers?? What is the age of the oldest section of TM Pipeline and where is it?

    12 Jan 2013, 06:36 AM
    answered
    We cannot provide a precise answer regarding the types of petroleum that ship on the pipeline as they will change from time to time.
    Right now we expect that about 60% or 540,000 barrels per day will be heavier oil. The remainder is light oil and refined products.
    Most of the heavier oils are destined for the Westridge Terminal (for tanker loading) but we are seeing a trend in the coming years for more light oil including upgraded synthetic crude processed in Alberta being exported. Diluted bitumen has been shipped in the Trans Mountain system for over 30 years.
    The oldest sections of pipe in the Trans Mountain system date from the original construction in 1953. These sections exist all along the route between Edmonton and Burnaby. Over the years, during routine maintenance activities, small sections of the original pipe have been replaced to ensure that the entire pipeline remains in excellent condition.
    15 Jan 2013, 12:53 PM

  • anonymous asked

    Is this pipeline a bitument line or what product will be pumped through the line? As a concerned Canadian we as a people need to look into secondary refinery instead of just pumping raw resources to other countries.

    07 Jan 2013, 07:13 AM
    answered
    The existing Trans Mountain pipeline is unique in the world in that it can transport both crude oils and refined products in a single pipe. The expertise to do that was developed here by Trans Mountain more than 25 years ago. This innovation has played an important part in serving the needs of all British Columbians.
    Today the pipeline is full and has been for years and to meet the needs of our customers we’re proposing to expand it. The expansion will increase the available capacity and separate the refined products already shipped from the heavy crude oils providing more capacity for all petroleum types including refined products and value added synthetic crudes which are processed from the oilsands in Alberta.
    While it is true that we expect the majority of the new capacity to be used by heavy crudes, the Trans Mountain expansion will also provide an important outlet for more value added materials in BC and Alberta creating benefits for all Canadians.
    11 Jan 2013, 09:28 AM

  • anonymous asked

    Is this a union pipeline!! And I'd so how do I go about getting my rig on this proposed job? Or is this gonna be a typical union pipeline family job?

    07 Jan 2013, 07:09 AM
    answered
    We are in the early stages of the proposed Trans Mountain Expansion Pipeline Project and are still a few years away from securing vendor opportunities. We appreciate hearing from you.
    You can email us at info@transmountain.com with your company name and contact details and we will add your name to our list of interested suppliers.
    You may also wish to sign up to receive project updates and specify that you are interested in vendor or supplier opportunities. You can do this through the 'stay informed' form on the homepage of this website.
    11 Jan 2013, 05:21 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_26 asked

    AS we live within 2 kilometres of the Kamloops Pumping Station we are wondering if this will increase the size of the pumping station. We have lived that close for the past 35 years and have no complaints, just the odd time when they are blowing off and we have received warnings of such action Thank you

    14 Dec 2012, 10:03 AM
    answered
    The scope of the project includes a second pump station at Kamloops Terminal within the existing property. The size and number of pump units has yet to be determined. There are no plans to increase the number of tanks at the Terminal. The “blowing-off” you refer to is likely related to pipeline maintenance activities and these activities are not associated with the addition of a second pump station.
    20 Dec 2012, 05:03 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_21 asked

    if your company is in busness to make a profit then any money that is saved on a improper of incomplete cleen up more profit for your shareholders our current government is in the process of removing environmental protection of lakes rivers and streams and the ocean which will no doubt make your company more profit in the long term what makes you think that i will belive your company will put our beautiful british columbia and its people before your companys profits.

    12 Dec 2012, 07:02 AM
    answered
    Working openly and co-operatively with all levels of government, Aboriginal groups, and stakeholders, Trans Mountain is committed to minimizing impacts to the local environment, health, and community.
    Trans Mountain is committed to best practices in reclamation and mitigation, always striving for opportunities leading to advancement. As with all of its construction projects, Trans Mountain will reclaim and mitigate any areas that are affected by the proposed pipeline expansion project.
    Trans Mountain is committed to full reclamation and mitigation measures of the pipeline right-of-way and surrounding areas following construction. This could include developing new habitats, improving water crossings or bettering migration corridors. For more information on Environmental Responsibility please go to this link.
    Additionally, Trans Mountain is committed to working with Aboriginal groups, residents, regulatory authorities and other stakeholders on environmental initiatives, as described on the website here.
    21 Dec 2012, 06:03 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_17_2 asked

    It is good to hear you say you are looking at ways to mitigate the noise problem of visiting vessels because at least the company acknowledges there is a problem that needs to be dealt with. Since you seem to suggest that the land based power solution is politically driven and entirely out of your hands, what other solutions are you specifically looking into that would address the problem sufficiently?

    09 Dec 2012, 04:45 AM
    answered
    We are researching design and procedural means to address the communities’ needs. We expect to share more in the spring and early summer of 2013 prior to our facilities application.
    13 Dec 2012, 05:41 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_25 asked

    Are your company willing to deposit $ 50,000,000,000. Dollars ( Fifty Billion Canadian Dollars) with the Province of British Columbia, as a surety, in case there is an oil spil in B.C. from your proposed pipeline across British Columbia ?

    08 Dec 2012, 11:43 AM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan will cover all costs associated with cleaning up spills originating from its pipelines and facilities. We are aware that the BC Provincial Government has initiated a review of the current status of terrestrial spill response with the stated intent of re-enforcing the polluter-pay principle including a review of the funding mechanisms in place.
    20 Dec 2012, 04:23 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_24 asked

    How much of the product currently moving through the pipeline is used by Canadians? How much is exported and to where? How many BC jobs will be involved in the twinning process? How many BC jobs are currently involved in this pipeline (ie. operations, maintenance, monitoring, safety, upkeep, etc.)? Will there be more jobs for BC workers after the twinning is finished? How many? Do all residents with property affected by the twinning currently have knowledge of this? How much protection is there for each of them should they be opposed to the project? Are there alternative measures that could replace this twinning project proposal? What are they? Do TransMountain and KinderMorgan have social responsibility principles and policies within their corporate mission statements? How would I access these?

    08 Dec 2012, 10:25 AM
    answered
    In order to ensure we answer each of your questions, we have broken up your question into its 12 parts:
    Questions 1 & 2) How much of the product currently moving through the pipeline is used by Canadians? How much is exported and to where?
    All of the crude oil and refined products shipped on Trans Mountain comes from either Alberta or North-east BC. The use of the pipeline can change from time-to-time based on the needs of our customers. In 2010 for example about 30% of the volumes we transported were delivered directly to locations in BC, 30% for offshore export on tankers and 40% by a connecting pipeline into Washington State. It’s not possible for us to quantify exactly how much is used by Canadians but we believe some crude processed in Washington State is processed into refined products and either trucked or barged back into Vancouver for use here, so it would likely be a bit more than 30%. The destination of the 30% that is exported on tankers is controlled by the shippers and thus we don't have exact statistics, however we believe approximately 80% is destined for California, 10% is to China and the other 10% fluctuates.
    Question 3) How many BC jobs will be involved in the twinning process?
    All job estimates are based on preliminary information and generated through the Statistics Canada Input/Output model.
    The proposed expansion is anticipated to create approximately 21,400 person-years of employment for project development through to construction between 2012 and 2017. An incremental 5,800 person-years of employment will result from pipeline operations over the period 2018 to 2048 (Statistics Canada model estimates over a 30 year life span). The combined employment through construction and operations represents an equivalent of more than 750 full-time jobs every year during the time span 2012 to 2048.
    Question 4) How many BC jobs are currently involved in this pipeline (ie. operations, maintenance, monitoring, safety, upkeep, etc.)?
    There are currently 119 Kinder Morgan full-time employees in BC. Sixty-seven of those people work on the operation and maintenance of the Trans Mountain system. In addition to these full-time regular positions are temporary employees, summer students and contractors that fluctuate.
    Question 5 & 6) Will there be more jobs for BC workers after the twinning is finished? How many?
    The proposed expansion is anticipated to create 35 new full-time, permanent positions in BC.
    Question 7) Do all residents with property affected by the twinning currently have knowledge of this?
    We are currently in the process of determining a preferred route for the new pipeline through route studies and discussions with landowners. Until that work is complete early 2013, we will not be able to tell where the new line is proposed. In the meantime, we are in the process of contacting all landowners who have land along the existing pipeline to provide information on the new proposed expansion, discuss any questions or concerns they may have and obtain survey permission to enable us to complete the routing, engineering and environmental studies we need for our NEB Application. In areas where urban development, engineering or environmental issues exist, we are examining whether alternate routes might be available to us for the new pipeline. Over the next 6 months, we will be contacting any additional landowners who may be affected by these alternative routes to explain the proposed project, answer questions and determine their views on the alternative routes.
    Questions 8) How much protection is there for each of them should they be opposed to the project?
    Landowners have specific legal rights related to pipelines and new proposed pipelines. The National Energy Board (NEB) has produced a very comprehensive guide for landowners and the public that includes details about the regulatory process governing pipeline projects. This information is available at www.neb-one.gc.ca. We would encourage you to read this guide to get a full understanding of landowner rights and the regulatory process for projects such as the Trans Mountain Expansion Project.
    Over and above legal rights landowners have, Trans Mountain greatly values and works to protect the good relationships developed with landowners over the past 60 years since the pipeline was first put into service. A key objective for Trans Mountain continues to be to treat each landowner fairly and equitably. For those who may be directly affected by the proposed expansion project, Trans Mountain will identify and work to address landowners’ concerns and questions about the project. Our goal will be to reach amicable agreements with each landowner.
    In cases where Trans Mountain is unable to reach a mutually agreeable settlement with a landowner, the NEB will provide a multi-step process to address differences of opinions as part of the routing review and approval process.
    Question 9 & 10) Are there alternative measures that could replace this twinning project proposal? What are they?
    Pipelines are the safest and most efficient means of transporting petroleum products over land. Tanker trucks and tanker railcars are used in some instances as alternatives to pipelines; however these modes are not practical for the volume of product that Trans Mountain moves.
    The volume of oil that moves through the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline each day is equivalent to 441 tanker railcars or 1,400 tanker trucks – this translates to one tanker truck leaving Edmonton for Burnaby every minute each day.
    Question 11 & 12) Do TransMountain and KinderMorgan have social responsibility principles and policies within their corporate mission statements? How would I access these?
    We demonstrate our commitment to social responsibility by demonstrating excellence in the areas of environment, health and safety. As of 2011, Kinder Morgan Canada’s employees have worked 2 million hours without a lost time incident. Additionally, Kinder Morgan Canada is actively involved in a number of projects aiming to enhance the wildlife habitat within our operating areas. Several of these initiatives have received international recognition from the Wildlife Habitat Council, an non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and conservation of wildlife habitat. Additional information on Kinder Morgan’s commitment to environmental health and safety can be found at this link.
    03 Jan 2013, 04:10 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_23 asked

    The report metions earthquakes and soil stability, but I could not find Tsunami information. Is it in the report?

    08 Dec 2012, 03:12 AM
    answered
    Our engineering and environmental teams are in the midst of a number of studies that will inform the placement and design of the pipeline so as to mitigate risks posed by earthquakes and unstable ground.
    A risk assessment is underway to determine all aspects of the project, which includes an assessment of the risk of a Tsunami.
    It is worth noting that according to studies by the BC Government, the tsunami hazard is rated as ‘very low’ for the area (Clague and Orwin, 2005; BC Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General, 2005).
    Citation: Clague, J.J. and Orwin, J., 2005. Tsunami Hazard to North and West Vancouver, British Columbia. North Shore Emergency Planning Office.
    21 Dec 2012, 06:05 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_22 asked

    Why is this question and answer page so blank, and why did KinderMorgan representatives leave the peaceful demonstration in Victoria last night? If you want to know what people think, stay to hear what they have to say.

    07 Dec 2012, 03:32 AM
    answered
    This page was created to answer questions posed by the public. All questions that have been asked, are being answered.
    Kinder Morgan representatives stayed throughout the peaceful protests in Victoria on Dec 5th. When the demonstrations became disruptive, including vandalism and refusing other members of the public the opportunity to review materials, Kinder Morgan made the decision to close down the public information session with the safety of everyone as the first priority. Before these actions took place, we had heard from over 180 people at this session who peacefully and respectfully expressed their opinions and asked their questions.
    11 Dec 2012, 08:34 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_21 asked

    as the negitive enviromental impacts of other oil spills around the globe are still being felt and while the companys that are responable for these spills still make huge profits the oil they spilled will never be compleatly removed from the envimoment and there will be a negitive impact on the people in the areas affected for all of time does kinder morgan realy know the true long term cost of incresed tanker trafic on the bc coast my vote says there would be none at all im sure the same clean up tactics would be used as exon valdez, bp gulf,enbridge kalamazo, etc why would i think your company would do otherwise ?

    06 Dec 2012, 03:02 PM
    answered
    Trans Mountain has been operating responsibly for 60 years on the BC coast and we stand on our record. We take spill response seriously - you can learn more about our spill response plans and procedures here.
    We are also conducting studies to learn about the impacts of the increased tanker traffic that would result from the proposed project. You can read about the details of the marine studies here.
    12 Dec 2012, 04:32 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_20 asked

    What precautions have you taken to anticipate the effects of earthquakes along the route?

    06 Dec 2012, 12:05 PM
    answered
    Through its experience with managing pipelines in the varied terrain of North America, Kinder Morgan Canada is very aware of the effect of the geologic environment on its pipeline infrastructure. Our Geohazard Management Program is one of the key tools for managing the risks associated with natural hazards to pipeline infrastructure.
    We are committed to reducing the earthquake risks to the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline and we proactively assess earthquake hazards with consideration of advancements in understanding how pipelines perform during seismic events.
    Where the pipeline or facilities are determined to be at risk of failure from an earthquake, pipeline infrastructure improvement projects are completed to reduce the risk.
    Examples of projects completed to manage earthquake risk are: the replacement of the pipeline crossing of the Fraser River by directional drilling to install the pipeline below susceptible soils, and the reinforcement of the earthen dykes at Burnaby Terminal.
    We have also prepared an Earthquake Action Protocol to rapidly prioritize locations for pipeline inspection following an earthquake. This Protocol includes shutting down and isolating the pipeline in the event of a serious earthquake.
    More details about our seismic safety measures and plans to ensure the proposed pipeline anticipates and mitigates effects of an earthquake can be found here.
    11 Dec 2012, 06:24 AM

  • scottym asked

    At the increased pipeline capacity of 750000 bbl per day. How many years before a further increase in capacity is required?

    05 Dec 2012, 11:15 AM
    answered
    The capacity and scope of the project is determined by the level of the commercial support received. Subsequent to the original question, we announced on January 10th an increased capacity to 890,000 bpd based on additional 15 and 20 year firm commitments from our customers. Any consideration of future expansion would have to stand on its own merits and be subject to the same processes as the current expansion.
    22 Feb 2013, 03:21 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_17_2 asked

    I read you propose to build 3 berths for tankers. The 24 hour noise of generators on waiting tankers is hugely annoying and diminishes the living and sleeping pleasure of people living around the bay in Belcarra, Burnaby and Deep Cove in no uncertain terms. (I am sure you are familiar with the impact of noise traveling over water.) Is it possible to have all tankers moor at your proposed berths and have them hook up to a landbased power supply on those berths? That way they don't have to use their noisy generators and that would give us the enormous pleasure back of not having to be disturbed 24 hours a day by generator noise of waiting tankers.

    05 Dec 2012, 08:02 AM
    answered
    As part of our facility development plans we are looking into ways to mitigate the impact of ambient noise from vessels calling at Westridge Terminal. This includes the feasibility of providing shore power. However, the majority of the international tanker fleet is not equipped to receive an external power source and operate fully.
    That said, if future regulations or developments make more shore-power equipped tankers available to us, we would be prepared to accommodate their needs.
    We will share more information with the community prior to finalizing our facility design options, which should be available in early summer of 2013.
    08 Dec 2012, 12:01 PM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_16 asked

    Could you please advise where are the planned routes for the twinned pipeline are being currently located through the City of Edmonton in more detail than on the below provided high level map? I am living in Aldergrove community in West Edmonton. Do you plan on using the same Kindermorgan pipeline's corridor that is currently going via our community in between our homes back yards?

    04 Dec 2012, 03:57 PM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan Canada is aware that land use has changed significantly in areas of Edmonton surrounding the Trans Mountain Pipeline right-of-way since the completion of the original line in 1953.
    Kinder Morgan is not likely to use the existing Trans Mountain right-of-way through Edmonton for the proposed expansion project but cannot eliminate the possibility until an alternative route is identified.
    Alternative routing options are being assessed along the north and south portions of Edmonton’s Transportation/Utility Corridor (TUC), which runs along Anthony Henday Drive, and once the preliminary routing assessments in Edmonton are complete we will be communicating the route options publicly. The Edmonton TUC was established by the Government of Alberta in the 1970s to accommodate a ring road, transmission lines, pipelines, and municipal utility lines.
    Extensive environmental and technical field studies will help inform the route selection. The route will need to deviate from the TUC in order to link back up with the Trans Mountain right-of-way. In these areas, routing will also involve a comprehensive consultation process with communities, neighbours, and landowners.
    15 Dec 2012, 08:32 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_14 asked

    If there are spills, and there will be judging by the recent events, who will pay for the cleanup and how quickly will the response be?

    02 Dec 2012, 05:13 AM
    answered
    As part of an ongoing commitment to safety and environmental protection, Trans Mountain takes responsibility for the cleanup and remediation of spills by responding immediately to any release from the pipeline system.
    With respect to financial responsibility, Kinder Morgan covers these costs and then recovers them from insurance or third parties if applicable. Trans Mountain works closely with local police and fire departments, government agencies, regulators and Aboriginal communities in developing and maintaining comprehensive plans to ensure preparedness for any type of potential emergency - land-based or marine-based.
    Aerial and ground patrols, calls from the public to Trans Mountain’s toll-free emergency number (1-888-876-6711), and 24/7 SCADA monitoring and leak detection systems combine to ensure we are quickly notified and respond to any potential emergencies.
    Emergency response plans are constantly being updated to keep them current. The plans are location specific, identify locations of emergency response materials and equipment, and are regularly practiced through field deployment exercises.
    21 Dec 2012, 06:09 AM

  • Tom B asked

    As a landowner affected by the pipeline route (since 1979) I feel that the proposed expansion has already (and in the future) negatively affected both resale price and demand for properties affected by the right-a-way. What will be done to compensate those property owners for current and future losses if the project goes ahead.

    30 Nov 2012, 07:19 AM
    answered
    We appreciate this is a concern and we have been investigating potential impacts upon properties for sale – both with easements and without easements.
    To date, our investigation have not shown a measurable effect, however we will continue to monitor this situation. We appreciate that most homes with the existing pipeline were built after the pipeline was in-place and the easement would have been disclosed to the buyer at that time.
    Looking ahead to the proposed new pipeline, under the NEB Act, companies are required to compensate landowners for any new easement and pay for any damages and inconvenience associated with the new pipeline. Included within the determination of compensation is any change in the value of the property before and after the pipeline was built.
    13 Dec 2012, 04:41 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_12 asked

    Do you plan to list on the TSX ??

    30 Nov 2012, 04:28 AM
    answered
    The pipeline is indirectly 100% owned by Kinder Morgan Energy Partners (KMP). KMP is traded on NYSE. At this time, there is no plan to list KMP or Trans Mountain on the TSX.
    11 Dec 2012, 06:26 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_10 asked

    The current pipeline is one protected salmon stream away from a habitat for humanity site here in burnaby. A detailed map of the proposed rout as it relates to Burnaby would put a great amount of speculation and worry to rest.Can you provide that?

    29 Nov 2012, 07:50 PM
    answered
    Maps of the proposed route for the Trans Mountain Expansion Project are not yet available, since the proposed route is still in development.
    Our plan, though, is to parallel the existing pipeline to the extent practical (click on this link to see detailed community maps of the existing pipeline route.
    For those areas, such as Burnaby, where urban development or environmental and engineering constraints make paralleling the existing pipeline impractical, we will be exploring alternative routes for the new pipeline and sharing them with the public once the preliminary routing assessments are completed.
    Our primary focus in developing these new options will be safety above all else — safety for landowners, the environment and communities. We will work with communities, landowners, Aboriginal groups and stakeholders as we complete extensive engineering and environmental studies to identify and evaluate route options for the proposed Trans Mountain Expansion Project. The results of these studies and discussions will form a part of our NEB application.
    Key factors we will consider in selecting and evaluating alternate routes include:
    1) Human - Land use: residences, commercial, recreation, parks
    2) Environment - Environmentally sensitive areas; Water crossings; Wetlands and wildlife; Rare and endangered species
    3) Engineering - Public and worker safety; Technical constraints / possible construction techniques; Geotechnical conditions; Pipeline length; Number and difficulty of crossings (highways, roads, other line crossings)
    20 Dec 2012, 04:41 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_9 asked

    does kinder morgan have enough liability insurance to totally cover the cost of an oil spill from it's transmountain pipeline?

    29 Nov 2012, 01:18 PM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan carries insurance necessary to respond to spills or releases from our pipelines and facilities. Kinder Morgan monitors this program continuously, and makes annual adjustments as necessary.
    12 Dec 2012, 04:35 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_9 asked

    should there be a spill either on land or in harbour, who will be responsible for the total cost of cleaning up and returning any affected area to it's original conditional?

    29 Nov 2012, 01:12 PM
    answered
    Liability for an oil spill depends on the source of the spill. Kinder Morgan would cover the costs of a spill clean-up and restoration and then recover them from insurance or third parties if applicable.
    If oil were released from the Trans Mountain Pipeline, final responsibility for cleanup costs would depend on whether the spill was the fault of Kinder Morgan or a third party.
    If oil were to be released from a ship, the ship owner would be the responsible party and would pay all clean-up costs. They would rely on Western Canada Marine Response Corporation and other Canadian contractors who have the equipment, manpower and expertise necessary to return the affected area to its original condition.
    There are a variety of industry-funded sources available to cover the costs of cleaning up such a spill. Visit IOPC Funds to learn about the International Oil Pollution Compensation Funds, and SSOP Fund to learn about Canada’s Ship-source Oil Pollution Fund.
    11 Dec 2012, 09:26 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_8 asked

    Why don't we save it for our future ?

    28 Nov 2012, 10:37 AM
    answered
    The Canadian Centre for Energy states that by most measures, Canada consistently ranks among the top 10 energy producers in the world, and that Canada's energy production is always higher than its consumption.
    Canada is a net energy exporter, and with our energy exports accounting for 22.4% ($90.7 billion in revenue) of all Canadian exports in 2010, they drive a substantial part of the overall Canadian economy. As of December 2010, energy was the fourth largest contributor to Canada's GDP, representing 6.34%.
    Kinder Morgan understands that with current production that exceeds our domestic needs and some of the largest energy reserves in the world, Canada is uniquely positioned to benefit from our abundant energy resources. Canada can best support its economy now and in the long term by supplying energy to our trading partners, while maintaining an energy supply for our future Canadians.
    01 Dec 2012, 11:47 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_8 asked

    Is it going to make Gas cheaper for average Canadians and by how much ?

    28 Nov 2012, 07:09 AM
    answered
    Gasoline prices are affected by a large number of global factors. The prices of crude oil are neither controlled nor directly influenced by the development of any specific pipeline.
    There are some valuable resources online that explain the factors that influence gas prices, including the following links:
    - NEB web page
    - CAPP web page
    29 Nov 2012, 10:38 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_7 asked

    I keep hearing it is your customers who want the expansion. Who and where are these customers located ?

    28 Nov 2012, 07:01 AM
    answered
    A full list of the customers that have contracted to ship on the proposed expansion can be found on our website here.
    Each customer name is linked to their website where you can find out more about their company. In addition the pipeline directly serves other customers including Chevron in British Columbia and Shell and Phillips 66 in Washington State.
    29 Nov 2012, 10:39 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_6 asked

    Would the new pipeline follow the existing one through the Coquihalla canyon? If so, what will you do to minimize disruption to the Trans Canada Trail (former CPR railbed) that is adjacent to the pipeline? Are there plans to improve recreational access to the area?

    27 Nov 2012, 05:25 AM
    answered
    The new pipeline may pass through the Coquihalla canyon, however exact routing options through the area are still being examined and alternate routes are being considered.
    Overall, Project-related impacts on recreation use are being addressed in the environmental and socio-economic assessment. This will include development of mitigation plans to reduce impacts and optimize opportunities to enhance recreational use.
    Proposed mitigation/enhancement measures will be part of the final environmental and socio-economic assessment, which is anticipated to be complete in late 2013, and then will be carried forward into the planning and design of the Project.
    29 Nov 2012, 10:41 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_5 asked

    Would you please consider including "pounds per square inch" [psi] pressure ratings because 3000 kilopascals means nothing to me except "big pressure".

    23 Nov 2012, 03:34 AM
    answered
    To convert kilopascals (kPa) to pounds per square inch (psi), the kPa value is multiplied by 0.145. Therefore, the normal operating pressure in the existing Trans Mountain Pipeline at the Fraser River crossing just south of Coquitlam, BC ranges from around 290 psi to about 435 psi.
    24 Nov 2012, 05:49 AM

  • north 40 asked

    Please include the PSI in the form of lbs per square inch as well, as a lot of the older people reading these have no understanding of the metric system whether it be kilo pascals or bars. Thanks, it's a lot of the older people you are talking to that will be interested in these questions. How many other compressor stations and scraper traps are going to be added to the existing ones now in use ?

    22 Nov 2012, 11:44 AM
    answered
    First part of your comment: to convert kilopascals (kPa) to pounds per square inch (psi), the kPa value is multiplied by 0.145. Therefore, the normal operating pressure in the existing Trans Mountain pipeline at the Fraser River crossing just south of Coquitlam ranges from around 290 psi to about 435 psi.
    Second part of your question: Centrifugal pumps are used to move liquid petroleum products through the Trans Mountain system so the term pump station is used. Compressor stations are used on natural gas pipelines. Two new pump station facilities will be added at Obed, AB and Black Pines, BC as is shown on the proposed route map.
    In addition to that, new pumps will be added at a number of existing pump stations as per the route map.
    A scraper trap is an assembly used to send/receive scraper (or cleaning) pigs and in-line inspection tools for maintenance operations. Five new scraper trap facilities will be installed. At Rearguard, BC new scraper trap facilities will be installed for both the Existing and New Line, and at Edmonton, AB, and Kamloops and Burnaby, BC for the New Line. Scraper traps at Darfield, BC, will be deactivated, disconnected and moved to Black Pines, BC on the Existing Line.
    24 Nov 2012, 05:51 AM

  • EGolds asked

    What is the operational pressure in the pipeline where it crosses the Fraser River and then goes uphill into Coquitlam?

    11 Nov 2012, 06:39 AM
    answered
    Normal operating pressure in the existing Trans Mountain pipeline at the Fraser River crossing just south of Coquitlam is 2,000 to 3,000 kPa. The pressure changes with product type (refined products, light crude, heavy crude) and destination (Burnaby, Suncor Refined Products Terminal).
    At this time, while the pressure of the existing line may be considered representative of the possible pressure for the proposed Trans Mountain expansion, the final range of pressure for the proposed pipeline is as of yet unknown.
    14 Nov 2012, 07:59 AM

  • northcliffe asked

    we live just above the westridge terminal and are concerned about the design of the dock system, and the location of the ships not only at the dock, but where will they will sit in the inlet, waiting to be loaded, and or for tides. we understand that the docked boats will be visable from our location, how can we review this. also we are concerned with construction and loading noise levels.

    10 Nov 2012, 10:26 AM
    answered
    As our neighours, your input is important to us, and our intention at this stage is to gather your feedback and input to incorporate into our facility application and project plans. We understand that noise and aesthetics are of concern and will take these into account when planning the modifications of our Westridge Marine Terminal.
    Once preliminary site layouts have been prepared our neighbours will have the opportunity to view the design and offer further input. We will provide street level artistic renderings as a tool to provide neighbours with an idea of what they may see with the proposed facility modifications. We expect this information to be available approximately summer 2013.
    Regarding ship traffic, we are assessing the logistics of the increased traffic and will work with the Port of Metro Vancouver (PMV) to create a traffic management plan. This will allow the regulation of ships distributed between our berths, available anchorages within PMV, and if required, held in International waters. This is information that we are developing and will share with the community when available.
    14 Nov 2012, 10:42 AM

  • anonymous_qanda_user_3 asked

    How will Trans Mountain use the input from all the community engagements, in the aggregate, and will the decision making process the company uses based on these inputs be made transparent and disseminated back to the communities?

    06 Nov 2012, 11:42 PM
    answered
    All input received through the Trans Mountain Expansion Project stakeholder engagement program will be considered by the project team in developing and designing the proposed Expansion Project.
    When input is received from a member of the public or stakeholder, the stakeholder engagement team shares that input with the relevant discipline group, for example, questions or concerns about water courses would be directed to the Trans Mountain Environment Team, who will then take the comments into account in designing their studies and in assessing impacts and developing mitigation measures.
    We will be preparing a summary report of all comments received during the current round of information sessions and a description of how those comments are being considered by the Project Team. We are expecting to make this available to the public in early 2013.
    In addition, all comments received at information sessions, at public meetings, through the website, online engagement, email address, info line and other engagement methods will be documented in Trans Mountain’s application to the National Energy Board (NEB).
    The application will include a description of comments and concerns raised by stakeholders along with a description of how Trans Mountain plans to address these comments. The application to the NEB will be a public document and is anticipated to be filed in late 2013.
    09 Nov 2012, 12:16 PM

  • christine asked

    How does the twinning of a pipeline work? Is it a completely new pipe or just an expansion?

    26 Oct 2012, 08:09 AM
    answered
    The twinning is a completely new pipe which is laid within or proximate to the right-of-way of the existing pipeline, so there are two pipes running the length of the line.
    The Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project would follow our existing pipeline route wherever practical. You can read more about what goes into the route determination and the studies that are part of this process on our website here. And you can learn about the construction process here.
    30 Oct 2012, 07:53 AM

  • christine asked

    What kind of benefits will BC get?

    26 Oct 2012, 08:05 AM
    answered
    The project is anticipated to generate a range of economic benefits in BC, including employment, local business opportunities, and provincial and municipal taxes.
    About 60% of Canadian direct expenditures during design and construction (or about $2.6 billion) are anticipated to be spent in BC. Further, during each year of operations, it is estimated that more than $55 million will be spent in BC (not including property taxes).
    Construction and operations are estimated to create about 46,000 person years of employment (direct, indirect and induced combined), again with 60% of this estimated for BC. BC will accrue provincial taxes for construction and operations of the project, estimated at $320M. Municipal taxes in BC are estimated to increase approximately $20M annually. The expansion is also anticipated to create 35 full-time permanent positions in BC, in addition to direct and indirect contracting opportunities in support of operations.
    Trans Mountain is also exploring opportunities to make other strategic investments in communities along the pipeline route.
    For more information please see the section of the website.
    01 Nov 2012, 03:02 AM

  • christine asked

    How long has the existing pipeline been in operation?

    25 Oct 2012, 10:45 AM
    answered
    Kinder Morgan Canada and its predecessor companies have safely and efficiently operated the Trans Mountain Pipeline through BC and Alberta, for almost 60 years. It was constructed in 1952 and began operating in 1953.
    27 Oct 2012, 09:46 AM

  • elmo asked

    When and where will you have information session in Burnaby?

    25 Oct 2012, 09:35 AM
    answered
    Two information sessions are planned for Burnaby during the week of November 19-25, 2012. Please check the calendar of events for specific locations, dates and times, to be announced shortly. If you are unable to attend these sessions, you are invited to participate online via the feedback form and discussion forums here and on the regional pages.
    27 Oct 2012, 04:34 AM

  • TransMountain asked

    This is a test question?

    17 Oct 2012, 09:04 AM
    answered
    This is a second test answer.
    17 Oct 2012, 09:05 AM

  • TransMountain asked

    This is a test question.

    12 Sep 2012, 04:43 AM
    answered
    test
    27 Oct 2012, 04:04 AM

  • TransMountain asked

    This is a test question.

    12 Sep 2012, 04:43 AM
    answered
    This is a test answer
    17 Oct 2012, 09:05 AM